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Tagged:  Wheel Throwing Techniques




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How to Make a Tagine

Posted On September 29, 2014 5 Comments

A few years ago a friend of mine had us over for dinner and served one of the most delicious dishes I had ever had. It was a tagine (traditional Moroccan dish named after the ceramic pot it is cooked in) and my mouth waters just thinking of it. Since my husband is an excellent cook, I have often thought about making a tagine for him. And after flipping through our latest book release In the Potters Kitchen, I might just get around to it sooner rather than later. Today, I am sharing the excerpt from In the Potters Kitchem that is inspiring me. Plus a recipe for a Shrimp Tagine. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor. 

 

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In the Potter’s Kitchen

Posted On September 23, 2014 Comments Off

NEW RELEASE!

Do you even know any potters who don’t cook? Wouldn’t it be great if there were a pottery design, technique, and glaze recipe book put together with a food recipe book? Well now there is! Each chapter includes an overview of the type of ware being discussed, design considerations, projects for making pots, and of course, recipes to cook in them! This book is truly a one-of-a-kind experience.

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How to Create a Beautiful Lobed Rim on a Wheel Thrown Plate

Posted On September 19, 2014 4 Comments

Plates have to be one of my favorite pottery forms to make. I love the big open canvas for decoration and the fact that they can double as wall art if you so desire. Because they are so much fun, though also deceptively challenging, we decided to put together a compilation of plate-making techniques from several different artists. In today’s post, I am sharing an excerpt in which Forrest Lesch-Middelton demonstrates a great way to make a beautiful altered rim on a large plate. Gorgeous. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Throwing and Decorating a Platter with Adam Field

Posted On September 18, 2014 0 Comments

Plates require more clay that a lot of other forms and Adam Field starts off with great tips on how to set the clay up right from the beginning to make your job easier. Throughout the demo, Adam discusses structural considerations that he takes to make his plates function as beautifully as they look. In addition he shares some nifty tips on some improvised tools he uses from items that most of us would just throw away. Rather than decorating the center part of his plate, Adam Field chooses to decorate the rim with his carving and shares the secrets to setting up his intricate repeating patterns.

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Throwing and Decorating a Platter with Forrest Lesch-Middelton

Posted On September 18, 2014 Comments Off

Forrest Middelton makes the largest wheel-thrown plate on the compilation, beginning with 12.5 pounds of clay, and gives great advice on how to center this much clay without wrecking your wrists. Then he shares how he uses a process similar to how he throws cylinders to make a plate with a wide rim that can be darted and altered. He finishes it all off with his signature screen printed image transfer.

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A Sweet Handbuilt and Wheel Thrown Dessert Bowl

Posted On August 22, 2014 13 Comments

In today’s post, Deborah Schwartzkopf, a master at designing beautiful non-round functional pottery, shows us how she makes her dessert bowls. The clip is an excerpt from her utterly inspiring new DVD Pieces and Patterns: Complex Forms from Handbuilt and Wheel-Thrown Parts, which is now shipping!! Enjoy!

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How to Throw an Oblong Bowl on the Potters Wheel

Posted On July 30, 2014 9 Comments

We recently featured a square baking dish project on the blog (with a rhubarb crisp recipe too!), but today I thought I would point out that you can use that technique to make all shapes and sizes of baking dishes or bowls. In this post Richard Phethean shows how he makes an asymmetric bowl in a similar way. I really like how he contrasted the asymmetric shape in the finished pot (at left) with a spiral mark on the floor of the pot. Have a look and then see what kind of shapes you can come up with. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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How to Transfer Images to the Inside of a Wheel Thrown Bowls

Posted On July 25, 2014 9 Comments

We have posted a few videos on Ceramic Arts Daily over the years of artists using screen printing techniques on clay in one way or another. But until filming Forrest Lesch-Middelton’s DVD Volumetric Image Transfer on Clay, I had never seen anyone screen print on the inside of a wheel thrown bowl. In today’s post, an excerpt from the DVD, you’ll see the ingenious method Forrest came up with to get his screen-printed imagery onto what he calls his inside-out jars. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Building Complex Pottery Forms Simply

Posted On July 16, 2014 6 Comments

Bryan Hopkins jokingly refers to his pots as dysfunctional vessels because of their high loss rate. But he says that just comes with the territory when your goal is to push the material to its limits. In today’s post, an excerpt from an upcoming article in Ceramics Monthly, Hopkins explains his process, which includes throwing posts on the wheel, cutting them into slab sections, pressing some of the sections into bisque molds, then putting all back together in interesting constructions.

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How to Throw an Optimally Designed Whiskey Cup

Posted On July 7, 2014 1 Comment

Whiskey bottles are a popular form in a lot of potters’ vocabularies – understandably because whiskey is delicious! But you also need a cup to drink the whiskey from and if you’re like Matt Schiemann, you put just as much thought into the design of your whisky cups as you do the bottle. In today’s post, an excerpt from the July/August 2014 issue of Pottery Making Illustrated, Matt explains how he designs his cups to make the whiskey drinking experience optimal! He also shares his glaze and slip recipes! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.