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Tagged:  Handbuilding Videos




Photo of Amy Sanders pressing a bisque forming plate into a slab of clay

How to Make Press-Molded Trays Using a Bisque Forming Plate

Posted On July 24, 2015 1 Comment
Today’s video clip is an excerpt from Amy Sanders’s DVD Creative Forming with Custom Texture. This project is one of my favorites from the DVD. After filming, I was so excited I went to the studio and cranked out a bunch of these bisque forming plates. Now I just need to find time to actually… Read More »
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How to Make a Jar With Press-Molded Decorative Strips and Wheel Thrown Parts

Posted On July 10, 2015 8 Comments

A. Blair Clemo has some of the most interesting pottery making techniques I have seen. His process involves press molds, coil building, wheel throwing, sprig molds and more. Though it looks fairly complex, it’s really not when you break it down.

In today’s clip, an excerpt from his brand-spanking-new video Simply Ornate: Handbuilding and Wheel Throwing with Press Molds, Blair shows one of the ways he combines wheel thrown parts with custom press-molded decorative strips to make a sweet jar. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Pottery Video of the Week: The Puffy Handle – Sandi Pierantozzi Demonstrates a Great Alternative to a Pulled Handle

Posted On July 3, 2015 13 Comments

Pulled handles are lovely, but they are not the only option for creating great handles on your pottery. With a little imagination and skill, you can make successful handles in a multitude of ways. Our good friend Sandi Pierantozzi, who is not lacking in the imagination or the skills department, returns today with a great idea for an alternative to the pulled handle. In this clip, Sandi shares the technique for making her “puffy” handles. Enjoy!

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How to Dress up a Wheel Thrown Bowl with Curves

Posted On May 29, 2015 5 Comments

The cereal bowl selection at my house consists mainly of all of my reject bowls from over the years. It’s a motley crew of old, wonky pieces that make me want to reach for the nearest sledgehammer every time I open the cupboard. So I am on a mission: to replace them with more recent work that is finally feeling a bit more resolved and successful. So since I am bowl obsessed, I thought I would share an inspirational bowl video. In this clip, an excerpt from her DVD Creating Curves with Clay (which is now available ad a digital download!), Martha Grover demonstrates how she dresses up a basic ice cream or cereal bowl with curves inspired by orchids and flowing dresses. Enjoy! 

 

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Working with Homemade Tools and Bisque Molds to Create Texture on the Inside of a Bowl

Posted On May 21, 2015 2 Comments

What’s not to love about texture and clay? After all, it’s clay’s wonderful malleability that got us all hooked in the first place. And textured clay can work so well with glaze. In today’s post, an excerpt from her new video Low Tech Clay: High End Results, Kari Radasch shares a simple technique for creating texture on the inside of a bowl by using an easy-to-make tool and a bisque hump mold. An added bonus of this technique is that, because your mold is a hump mold, you can attach the foot right away so everything can dry at the same time, thus avoiding cracks! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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How to Handbuild a Stacked Dish Using Bisque Hump Molds

Posted On May 8, 2015 2 Comments

Combining multiple bisque molds to create stacked pots is a really fun way to explore form. A bonus is that you can stack the molds themselves before you even start on a piece to test out which forms work and which don’t. And once you have a good collection of molds in your arsenal, the possibilities for stacked combinations are practically limitless. Kari Radasch loves this way of working because it keeps her from getting bored in the studio, and it is a relatively quick way to work (good for a busy mom of two young children). In today’s post, an excerpt from her brand new video Low-Tech Clay: High End Results, Kari demonstrates one of her stacked dishes.

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The Drop-Technique: How to Make Softly Textured Tiles

Posted On April 17, 2015 7 Comments

Lana Wilson is known for her textured surfaces and she has some pretty fun ways of coming up with said texture. Take for example her “drop technique tiles.” Looking at these, it is a little bit difficult to figure out exactly how the soft-edged texture was created. The good thing is, in today’s post, an excerpt from her new DVD Handbuilding with Color and Texture, Lana demonstrates this unusual technique!– Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Tips for Making Graceful and Refined Handles Without Much Pulling

Posted On March 20, 2015 1 Comment

Pulling handles can be a challenging skill to master. It can be a little intimidating to try to pull them directly off the pot, but trying to transfer a handle to a pot after pulling it separately is also a challenge.

 

That’s why I really liked Paul Donnelly’s approach to handle making. Paul does very little pulling and does most of the shaping ahead of time. Then he lets the handles sit flat overnight. A little water rehydrates them the next day and they are ready for attaching. All of this helps Paul to make very tight, refined handles. Have a look at this excerpt from his new video! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Pottery Video of the Week: How to Design and Make a Stiff Slab Vase

Posted On March 13, 2015 4 Comments

In today’s video clip, an excerpt from our latest DVD project, Clay Projects and Fundamentals: A Resource for Aspiring Clay Artists and Teachers, Neil Patterson demonstrates a stiff slab vase project. He also gives great tips for working with paper to come up with interesting designs.

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How to Use the Broomstick Method to Make a Vase

Posted On February 23, 2015 7 Comments

I keep a lot of things in my studio that I think may one day be useful for texture or as a tool of some sort. I also cannot bring myself to throw any kind of wood in the garbage. I have a scrap collection that would be the envy of many a woodchuck. The other day, these two passions (let’s just call them passions for now) came together in a very useful way. I ran out to the garage and gathered every single dowel scrap I had and transfered them to the studio, thereby fulfilling both obsessive habits (okay, let’s call them what they really are). The reason I did this was because I watched the DVD Handbuilding with Mitch Lyons. He demonstrated a method for making cylinders that employed these dowels, and then went on to explore wonderful surface inlay and texture treatments that really got me excited about handbuilding again. And I got to use some of my scrap wood!  — Sherman Hall, Ceramic Arts Daily