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Tagged:  glaze chemistry




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Glaze Recipes From Two of Ceramics Monthly’s 2014 Emerging Artists

Posted On May 5, 2014 0 Comments

The May 2014 issue of Ceramics Monthly is out, and with it the ever popular Emerging Artists feature. 2014′s crop of artists includes 14 potters and sculptors. In today’s post, several of them share the glaze recipes they use to make their fresh and interesting work.-Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Video of the Week: John Britt Explains the Triaxial Blend

Posted On April 11, 2014 4 Comments

A triaxial blend is an excellent tool for learning about glazes and materials but if you’re new to glaze testing, just the words “triaxial blend” might give you pause.
Never fear! John Britt is here to demystify the triaxial blend in today’s video post. In this clip John clearly explains how a triaxial blend is set up and shows a fired example of a triaxial blend with stains, which nails the point home. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Using Glaze Additives to Make Average Glazes Great

Posted On March 31, 2014 5 Comments

Sometimes the glazes we use are good for one purpose, but not so good for another. A glaze might perform well when dipping or pouring, but dry so quickly when brushed the it’s nearly impossible to get an even coat. Glaze additives are the secret ingredients that can help remedy these problems. In today’s post, from the PMI archives, our own Jessica Knapp puts additives to the test. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

p.s.-This article appeared in the November/December 2011 issue of Pottery Making Illustrated. To buy this back issue in PDF format, click here!

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Understanding Glazes

Posted On December 9, 2013 Comments Off

How to Test, Tweak, & Perfect Your Glazes with John Britt

In this all-new Ceramic Arts Daily Presents video, John Britt lets you tap into his encyclopedic knowledge of ceramic glazes to build your own understanding of this complex topic. Starting with glaze testing—because testing is key to understanding raw materials and ceramic processes—John explains various testing methods that will help you get great results quickly. On disc two, John geeks out on materials, diving into the three basic components of a glaze—fluxes, glass formers, and refractories—and how various ceramic materials fit into those categories and work together to produce myriad outcomes. With this video, you’ll be able to deepen your understanding of glaze chemistry and improve your glazes at your own pace.

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How to Find Substitutes for Unavailable Raw Materials in Glazes

Posted On November 6, 2013 0 Comments

Glaze mixing can be daunting to the novice, especially when the recipe contains an ingredient that is unfamiliar or unavailable. But with a few simple melt tests, you can learn a lot about what materials do at your firing range and start making educated guesses as to what might make a good substitute for the unfamiliar ingredient. In today’s post, an excerpt from our new Ceramic Handbook Cone 5-6 Glazes: Materials and Recipes, Deanna Ranlett walks us through the testing she did to find substitutes for some frits. By following her lead, you can figure out substitutes for the materials you might be missing in a glaze! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Cone 5–6 Glazes: Materials and Recipes

Posted On October 28, 2013 0 Comments

NEW RELEASE!!

Cone 5–6 Glazes: Materials & Recipes provides an easy way to create your own glazes by understanding and testing what’s already been tried. This glaze book is a first of its kind because it pulls together more than 180 glaze recipes and hundreds of variations from 30 different artists in one book.

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Lichens and Lizards and Leopards, Oh My! Reticulated Glaze Recipes For Wild Ceramic Surfaces

Posted On September 30, 2013 8 Comments

Glazes are sometimes formulated to intentionally crawl and create reticulated surfaces resembling lichens, leopard coats, or lizard skin. Today, Robin Hopper presents a slip recipe and a base glaze recipes for such an effect, and gives examples of this slip and glaze combination with various ceramic colorants added.

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Simple Glaze Modifications That Can Reveal a Lot

Posted On July 19, 2013 5 Comments

Tom Turner has a new glaze video out and today I’m happy to announce that it’s available in the CAD bookstore! In this clip, Tom explains simple modifications you can make to a glaze recipe that can often lead to numerous new glaze discoveries! For example, by removing the iron from his example recipe, he comes up with a beautiful magnesium matt base glaze that could then be tested with other colorants. Have a look! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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How to Correct Five Common Ceramic Glaze Defects

Posted On July 1, 2013 14 Comments

It is especially true in the ceramics world that one person’s fault is another person’s fancy – especially when it comes to glaze “defects.” Many ceramic artists deliberately create faults in their glaze surfaces to achieve a particular aesthetic. But, of course, there are some cases in which a glaze must be perfect for reasons of safety or hygiene. So just in case glaze defects are driving you “craze-y” (sorry, I just couldn’t “resist”), today Robin Hopper gives some expert pointers on how to solve five of the most common pottery glaze problems (such as crawling, shown at left). – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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A Super Simple Analogy to Help You Understand Glaze Structure

Posted On June 28, 2013 11 Comments

Ceramic glazes consist of three main components: glass formers, fluxes, and refractories. If you can remember those, and familiarize yourself with the characteristics of the common ceramic raw materials, you are in good shape to start developing your own successfulglazes. For today’s video, I thought I would share John Britt’s simple glaze component analogy. It is a great way to remember how the three glaze components function in a glaze. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.