On the Cover: Paul Donnelly's cup and saucer, wheel-thrown, altered, and handbuilt porcelain, fired to cone 6. It's the ideal form for coffee and a roll or high tea and a scone.

 

Theme: Functional Work

 

Remember the rule about form following function? Well, here’s an issue that really illustrates that your forms can be highly creative and still get the job done. Annie Chrietzberg writes about Paul Donnelly’s excellent cup and saucer combinations in our featured project for this issue, and she’s joined by other equally creative takes on the idea of functional creative forms. Martha Grover demonstrates how to make a stunning lidded form, and Joan Bruneau and Arthur Halvorsen provide two entirely different takes on ways on making exciting flower holders. You’ll enjoy all four projects and much more in this issue.

 

 

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Cake? Just Add Flower!
by Arthur Halvorsen

Arthur loves parties and cakes and so he called on those themes for his playful flower brick that looks like a delicious decorated cake. Made from earthenware clay and simply decorated with add-ons and piped additions topped with a simple bluish tinted clear glaze, this item makes the perfect gift for the entertainer on your list.

 

The Necessity of Invention
by Annie Chrietzberg

Paul Donnelly faced a problem many of us have had — juggling a cup of coffee in one hand while holding a snack plate in the other. How can you grab a book or the remote? Simple . . . design a cup and saucer combination. With a love for architectural design, Paul’s construction technique is unique and sure to inspire your own invention.

 


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Treasure for Treasure
by Martha Grover

Martha sent in this project as a butter dish, but her forms and her use of the materials hardly warrant such a pedestrian form. Her technique for altering thrown pieces and adding slabs elevate her work to the treasure level, and it’s a process suitable at most any scale.

 

Martha Grover demonstrates her forming and glazing techniques in her 3-hour long DVD, Creating Curves with Clay. See all the action and discover the inside tips and techniques of one of the most talented and popular ceramic artists around. Read more and view a clip

 

 

Throw, Cut and Paste
by Joan Bruneau

Joan adds flair to her work. Not content with the simple round forms offered by the wheel, she explores altering them in uniquely creative ways. In her demonstration for making a flower vase, she shows how she constructs them from several thrown parts, alters then assembles them. The piece culminates with her glazing process which creates a truly distinctive, vibrant form.

 

 

Magic Rice Paper Transfers
by Kate Missett

Rice paper transfers have been around for awhile but they can be a little tricky. Kate investigated the whole process and reveals the secrets to both the materials and process.

 

 

Underglaze, Oxide, and Glaze Pens
by Holly Goring

Decorating with lines by using a brush is pretty close to using a pen and inkwell for writing. If you’re looking for consistent lines, a variety of colors and easy clean-up, then glaze pens are absolutely the best way to go. Holly discusses what’s out there and how to use them successfully.

 

 

Frits: Solving Solubility
by Bill Jones

Frits have been around for quite awhile but we often don’t consider them when batching glazes. They’re so convenient to use and actually can almost be used as glaze bases by themselves.

 

 

Get a Handle on Handles
by Annie Chrietzberg

Paul Donnelly’s cups and saucer combinations exhibit a real attention to detail. If you’re just interested in the cups, he’s got a great technique for the handles we thought you might enjoy.

 

 

Making an Impression
by Nancy Zoller

Before plaster, going back thousands of years, pottery molds were made from bisqueware. Nancy demonstrates how you can make highly decorative molds in a short period of time from clay. And while she shows a functional piece, the same concept can be used in many ways in the studio from creating sculpture parts to dinnerware sets — all without the plaster mess.

 

Slab Techniques
by Sumi von Dassow

While we’ve all used slabs at some point, Ian Marsh and Jim Robison explore a lot of things about slab techniques we haven’t considered. Read the entire review.

 

   

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