POTTERS COUNCIL CONFERENCE

 

ALTERNATIVE FIRING SURFACES
October 11-13, 2013
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Presented by Potters Council

Hosted by Edina Art Center
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CLICK HERE TO READ THE ALTERNATIVE FIRING SURFACES PRESENTER HANDOUT

 

 

PLAYING WITH FIRE
We have five highly talented presenters who will provide instruction on alternative firing surfaces, firing processes and different types of kilns. We will be doing three hands on firing session: raku, aluminum foil saggar and a pit firing. Attendees will learn skills to create their own approach to surfaces and how they relate to different alternative firings. Presenters will show you how to play with fire and have you ready to experiment in your home studio.
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Whether you throw or handbuild this conference has something for you to take back to your studio. This conference is open to artists at all levels: from enthusiastic amateur, to the teacher, and for the professional. No matter what level you are, if you’re open to learning and connecting with other ceramic artists then this is the conference for YOU!

 

 

Mark Your Calendar and Register Today

 

 

REGISTER NOW

 

Featured Presenters:
Billy Ray Mangham, Marcia Selsor, David Sturm,
Ken Turner, and Sumi von Dassow

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to register, click on a link below:

 

Schedule of Events | Presenters | Host & Sponsors

Hotel Information | Conference Location Information
Travel & Directions | Visitor Information
Registration Information

 

Highlights for Attendees…

 


 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS (back to top)
 
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Friday, Oct. 11, 2013 All events are located at
Edina Art Center
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Time Event Location
6-8 pm
Registration and Opening Reception Rm: TBD
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  Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit Rm: TBD
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  Presenters’ Art Exhibit Rm: TBD
     
Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013  
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Time Event Location
7:30-8 am Registration Rm: TBD
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  Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit Rm:  TBD
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8-12 pm Marcia Selsor
Rm: TBD
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  Ken Turner
Rm: TBD
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  Sumi von Dassow Rm: TBD
     
12-1 pm Lunch (provided) Rm: TBD
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  Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit Rm: TBD
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1-4 pm Marcia Selsor
Rm: Studio A
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  Billy Rae Mangham
Rm: Studio B
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  David Sturm Rm: Studio B
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Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013  
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Time Event Location
7:30-8 am Registration Rm: TBD
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  Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit Rm: TBD
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8-12 pm Marcia Selsor
Rm: TBD
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  Ken Turner
Rm: TBD
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  Sumi von Dassow Rm: TBD
     
12-1 pm Lunch (provided) Rm: TBD
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  Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit

Closes at 1pm

Rm: TBD
     
12:45-1 pm Pottery Exchange(optional) Rm: TBD
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1-4 pm Marcia Selsor
Rm: tbd
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  Billy Ray Mangham
Rm: TBD
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  David Sturm
 
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Saturday and Sunday Presenter Demonstrations
Potters Council is pleased to present two full days of demonstration and information exchange. Attendees will sign-up during Friday and/or Saturday morning registration. Attendees will be asked to choose one presenter for AM and PM for Saturday and Sunday. Each attendee will see four of the five presenters.
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Hands-on Firing – There is limited space for each class. For Saturday morning, attendees can pick to participate in Raku Firing, Aluminum Foil Saggar Firing or a Pit Firing. On Sunday morning attendees can pick to participate in Raku Firing or Aluminum Foil Saggar Firing.  There will only be a Pit Firing discussion on Sunday, as we are unable to do two pit firings due to timing.

 

Opening Reception

The opening reception starts at 6pm on Friday night. At the reception attendees will register and meet presenters, hosts and other attendees in a casual environment. It is a time for networking and making life long connections with other artists.

 

Sponsor/Vendor Exhibit
Attendees will have the opportunity from Friday through lunch on Sunday to visit with each of our sponsors. They will be available for you to ask questions and make some necessary product and equipment purchases.

 

Pottery Exchange
A great way to end two days of sharing and learning than by participating in a Pottery Exchange. Be sure to bring one piece of your personal work (no large pieces–size of mug or smaller) that you can trade with a fellow artist. This event will happen after lunch on Sunday and is sure to be one of the highlights of the conference.

 

Exhibit of Presenters Work

In addition to the Pottery Exchange, the presenter’s work will also be on display for view and purchase at the Edina Art Center’s Tearoom Gallery during the length of the conference. 

 


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PRESENTERS (back to top)

 

Billy Ray Mangham

Raku Firing the Big Ones! — Large Work in a Small Kiln
It is a challenge to fire a 36”, one hundred pound sculpture in a 24” top loading kiln but it can be done! Each piece is a chance to invent new tools for lifting and new ways of achieving reduction. Each firing presents unique problems and leads to a unique dance with the fire.
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While demonstrating my techniques for large figurative sculpture I will discuss the tricks I’ve developed, the tools I’ve fabricated, and the lessons I’ve learned from 40 years of production style Raku firing. I will show plenty of images of tools and a few short videos of the tools and the dance in progress. I will discuss my use of commercial glazes and underglazes and my personal formulas for glazes and engobes. Participants will leave my presentation with a new way to view the Raku process, some good tips on tools, glazes, and firing proceedures, and an understanding of the importance of wabi sabi and flow in my creative process.
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Additional Information

STATEMENT:
I have been working in clay for nearly 40 years. Each day brings new problems and challenges. And each day working with clay brings excitement and hope for the future o f mankind as i do my little part to patch together a civilization with materials from the earth.

 

My wife, Beverly, is a found object sculpture artist. We have exhibited our work at juried arts and crafts shows across the nation for over twenty years. Our venues have included A.C.C. shows in Baltimore, Chicago, and San Francisco, the New Orleans Jazz Festival, and many shows throughout Texas.

 

I am one of the five founders of the Texas Clay Festival that is held yearly in Gruene, Texas. We have presented a showcase of over 50 Texas clay workers for twenty years. I have taught workshops at the Mechosin Summer School for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Billy Ray, visit www.eotdac.com

 

MARCIA SELSOR

Saturday and Sunday Morning – Horse Hair and Feathers and Obvara
The First Process with Horse Hair and Feathers: The piece should be prepared ahead of the conference and fired to a cone 09 bisque. Hotter than cone 09 then the surface could seal making the carbon burning less absorbent. An ideal shape is a smooth surface with a 1″ hole in the top, so a heavy wire hook can be used to remove the pot. Coleman Porcelain is recommended, but a smooth thermal resistant white claybody will do. The surface should be coated with terra sigillatta* onto dry greenware and burnished with a soft cloth. The piece needs to be light so the weight of the pot doesn’t stress the lip and break. Heavier pieces can be lifted by tongs, but the tongs may mar the surface.

 

This is a fast firing process to 1100 degrees F. in a raku kiln for fast removal. Each piece is picked up using a coat hanger hook inserted in a small hole at the top of the pot. It is placed on a bed of sand or a blanket of fiber, rolled over the pre-arranged horse hair or feathers quickly and inverted to cool slowly (less than 5 seconds). We will have two small raku kilns for these firings. The first batch should take a half an hour and then get quicker as the kiln stays warm between the firings.

 

As we progress through the batches of 4-5 pieces, participants can assist with the rolling of their work or pulling the pots from the kiln depending on how comfortable they are in doing this.

 

The Second Process with Obvara Firing: For this process, bring a textured piece with crevices or ridges, there is no need to burnish. Obvara is an Eastern European firing method where the piece is removed from teh Kiln at 1650 degrees Fahrenheit , dipped into a wheatpaste solution of flour, sugar, and yeast. The solution carbonizes on the surface where there is texture, or pitting from additives in clay, such as sawdust, perlite, etc. The piece is rinsed in water to stop the carbonization. There is no smoke and no glaze used. This is a great process for an urban setting or for teaching.

 

Each person should bring 2 small bisqued pieces up to 5″ maximum in dimension and a pair of heat resistant gloves if possible. At least one of your pots will be fired. If time allows, two may be fired. The piece should be burnished preferably with terra sigilatta*. The other should be textured, or made from an experimental mix with coffee grounds, sawdust, or perlite, etc. 

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Discussion will cover surface preparation, burnishing techniques, coloring techniques and removing from the firing to the carbonizing station during the firing.
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What to bring: Bring heat resistant gloves. Respirator or mask. Two small bisqued pots.
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*SIMPLE Terra Sigillata Recipe:
Fill a plastic liter bottle 3/4 full of water. Add 250 grams of ball clay and 1-2 drops of darvon 7 or sodium silicate. Let the mix set for an hour or so..until you see three separate areas of the mix. Clear, light and dark.  Keep adding  drops maybe up to 7 drops after several settlings until the water on the top level retains a little color after an hour of settling.   Next, punch another hole in the bottle at the bottom of the lighter color mix. This is the terra sig. Let it squirt out of the hole and catch in a container. Wait  until your piece is bone dry and apply to the piece with a soft brush. Burnish with a soft   foam sponge after each  application. Do as many as you like until it is shiny.

 

We will have this solution mixed and ready to use: 

Obvara Mixture:

1 Kilo or 2.2 pounds of flour

1-2 packets of dried yeast

1 tablespoon of sugar

10 liters or 2.6 gallons of water

Mix and cover in a warm place. Let it stand for 3 days.

 

 

Saturday and Sunday Afternoon – Drawing, Resist, Color and Chemicals
Marcia will take an overall look at applying decoration to pieces in the following alternative firing processes: raku, carbon marking aka horse hair or feathers, saggar and smoke firing. She will demonstrate drawing on bisque slabs, applying latex and glaze, and the removing of the latex. Marcia will then share how she adds additional color of luster lines that is applied with an applicator.

 

Ceramics is a beguiling medium which can engage a lifetime of exploration. Marcia has been working in Raku for over 45 years beginning with a workshop with Paul Soldner in 1967. Although her experimentation in clay has lead to a wide variety of processes, she still fires raku, builds kilns and fires in a wide range of temperatures to meet the needs of a particular goal. Fast firing processes give ‘instant gratification”, more impromptu ideas to keep trying various approaches until satisfied. We can use a surface, prepare it to react in a certain way or reheat and erase. Flashing, fuming, smoking, post firing chemical effects, can create infinite possibilities.

 

Additional Information

Marcia is a Professor Emerita at Montana State University in Billings. Retiring in 2000, she has taught at additional universities including U of Hawaii-Manoa, U of Texas at  Brownsville and the Institute of the Arts in Tashkent Uzbekistan. She has taught workshops on a variety of subjects across the US, Canada, Spain, Italy, France. Her work is in public and private collection in nearly a dozen countries. She has had residencies at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, Archie Bray Foundation in Montana, The Banff Center in Alberta, La Meridiana in Italy, AIR Vallauris in France, Straumur Artists Commune in Iceland, Dzintari in Latvia, National Ceramics Factory in Uzbekistan, Mary Anderson Center for Creative Arts in Indiana. She has published articles in Ceramics Monthly, Pottery Making Illustrated, Studio Potter, Crafts International, British Archaeological Reports, Women’s Artists News, and contributed to a number of books including Studio Potter, the Book, Alternative Firing Techniques and A Pot for All Reasons.

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She served on the Board of Directors of NCECA, and served as Potters Council President as well as on the Technical staff of Ceramics Monthly for several years. She is the recipient of two Fulbright Scholars Awards: Spain in 1985-86 researching ethnic origins of pottery traditions across the country, and Uzbekistan in 1993 researching Islamic ceramics and architecture in Kiva, Bukhara, Samarkund, and Tashkent as well as teaching at the Art Institute.

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She currently maintains a studio in Brownsville, Texas.
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For more information about Marcia, visit www.marciaselsor.com

 


DAVID STURM

The Big Hot Box

David’s presentation will focus on one of the most important tools of the Raku Artist; the kiln itself. He will begin with a brief review of how the raku firing process differs from other firing profiles as well as how it is similar. He will then provide information on different fuel sources commonly utilized in the raku process and their pros and cons. Specific attention will be paid to various burner types.
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David’s session will then move into a detailed explanation of the general types of Raku kilns in use today. These will include fiber-lined barrel, top-hat, converted electric, brick shuttle, and dug out kilns. He will discuss the basic construction techniques for each, and the factors that need to be considered when deciding which type of kiln is right for you. David will demonstrate how to convert an existing electric kiln into a gas-fired kiln suitable for raku firing. Finally, this session will culminate in a discussion of how to select the right kiln and other equipment based on the parameters presented

 

Additional Information

David Sturm has been the kiln technician for Bracker’s Good Earth Clays since 1995. During his 18 years, he has designed and built brick and fiber raku kilns for personal and professional uses as well constructed hundreds of Bracker Raku Kilns for retail sale. David has also implemented design modifications and improvements to Bill Bracker’s original design as necessitated by changes in materials over the years. He continues to teach raku process and firing seminars for local schools, organizations, non-profit organizations and businesses.

 

 

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For more information about David, visit www.brackers.com

 

 

KEN TURNER
ALUMINUM FOIL SAGGAR FIRING
This alternative fast fire method will impart a beautiful and colorful atmospheric quality to the surface of your decorative ceramic work. Ken will discuss and demonstrate the process to insure the greatest possible outcome for participants. Beginning with clay body types, terra sigillata application and bisque firing temps. Then to pre-fire chemical solution application, organic and inorganic materials that can be added to impart further surface influence prior to wrapping in the work in the aluminum foil. And on to the process of loading the kiln and firing, which are a crucial component to the outcome. Horsehair decoration post firing is also an option with this technique. To conclude Ken will demonstrate sealing and enhancing the surface of your beautiful finished work.

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Participants Preparations: 2 or 3 small pieces 4”-6” made out of a clay body that will withstand the thermal shock of the quick fire process.  Using your choice of forming techniques and polished with terra sigillata or burnished, your work should be prepared ahead of the conference and fired to a cone 010 bisque ideally, however bisque fired up to cone 04 yields satisfactory results.  Avoid lowfire earthenware clay bodies as they are susceptible to cracking.  A highfire porcelain body that can withstand raku firing stresses yield beautiful results.  Terra sigillatta  is easy to make but may also be available at your nearest clay supply store.  Globe type forms are the most resistant to cracking and show the surface well.  These works are decorative only and should not be used to serve food or contain liquid.

 

Additional Information
Ken has had numerous exhibitions, his work in the collection of the Washington Art consortium, currently displayed at Northwest Museum of Art & Culture, and The American Museum of Ceramic Art, Pomona, CA.  Ken’s work has been shown and collected internationally; Concept Exhibition of Post Imperial Porcelain, Palace Museum Beijing, China, and is well represented in well numerous publications and private collections.
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Ken has defined his career in all aspects of the clay world, from studio pottery production to refined one-offs of decorative porcelain vessels and clay sculpture to kiln design and fabrication. Considered a master of his craft Mr. Turner has toured and lectured across China including The Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, and The Fine Arts College of Shanghai University, China. He has been a respected teacher of ceramic techniques at Universities, Colleges and Art Centers since 1994. He is currently A BFA instructor of Ceramics and the Director of the “Plastic Arts Lab” at Digipen Institute of Technology (Redmond, WA) where he designs the ceramic facility and class curriculum.

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For more information about Ken, visit www.kenturnerpottery.com

 

 

 

SUMI von DASSOW
Pit Firing - Saturday Morning Class
Pit firing is a collaboration between the potter and the elements of earth, air, and fire. Pots go into the pit plain white and emerge covered with wild color including yellow, orange, pink, red, and a rich black. All these colors come from materials put into the pit with the pots. What makes pit firing different from other alternative firings is that the pots and the coloring materials are all in the same space together, and what affects one pot will affect its neighbor. Though there are some ways of treating individual pots to achieve specific effects, for the most part the results are uncontrollable.
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The day will begin with preparing the pots for firing with optional materials such as copper scrubbers, gold leaf pen, and copper foil tape. During this time we will discuss what effects to expect from the various materials, both that which is applied directly to the pots and those that are put into the pit along with the pots. Then the pit will be loaded with pots, colorants, various  materials for creating color, and fuel including wood and wood shavings. After the pit is lighted, it will be covered and left to burn and smolder for 24 hours. 

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Attendees will fire one or two* moderate-sized pots each. The pit will be loaded Saturday morning and unloaded Sunday at lunch-time. Participants need to bring up to two pots to the event. For best results, use a smooth light-colored cone 5-6 stoneware body. If possible, the pots should be coated with terra sigillata (see suggested recipe below) and bisque-fired to cone 010. If terra sigillata is not available, use a buff-colored stoneware and bisque-fire to cone 010. Pots without terra sigillata may be burnished if desired.
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White Terra Sigillata
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2100 grams (2.1 liters) water
1000 grams OM4 Ball Clay
25 grams Darvan 7 or Darvan 811
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Measure water into a large glass or clear plastic jar with a wide mouth. Add Darvan and stir. Add clay and shake vigorously. Leave undisturbed to settle for three hours. You will see a dark layer of sludge at the bottom of the container. Siphon off the liquid portion above the layer of sludge. Be careful you don’t pick up any of the sludge. Discard the bottom layer of sludge. Apply by brushing or spraying and polish with fingertips or a soft cloth.
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Burnishing and Preparing pots for pit firing - Sunday Morning Class
Burnishing is the process of polishing clay, traditionally used instead of glaze by native potters all over the world, most famously by the Pueblo Indians of the Southwestern United States. Sumi will demonstrate two techniques of burnishing. She’ll show you how to achieve a beautifully seductive surface by rubbing a pot with a polished stone, and she’ll show you “the easy way” of burnishing by applying terra sigillata. She will also demonstrate how easy it is to make terra sigillata, by making a batch during the session. Sumi will demonstrate how you can decorate pots after they are burnished, using incised or painted patterns, as well as discussing materials that can be used in pit firing to create color and pattern on pots.  
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Hands-on: Participants can try burnishing with a stone and/or terra sigillata, using small tiles which Sumi will provide. She will also share recipes for making terra sigillata, and show portions of her DVD Pit Firing and Burnishing. She will bring examples of her work to demonstrate the effects of the materials and colorants used in pit firing.
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Sumi von Dassow has been making burnished pottery, and playing with firing it, for thirty years. She is the author of the book “Low-Firing and Burnishing” published by the American Ceramic Society and A&C Black.

 

Additional Information
Golden resident Sumi von Dassow is well-known in Colorado as a potter and ceramic artist, a teacher and a writer. Her work includes brightly-colored functional pottery, burnished and pit-fired vessels, and ceramic sculpture. She has participated in the Cherry Creek Arts Festival and has won numerous awards in major local and national shows. Her work has appeared in books and magazines, and is in the permanent collections of several arts institutions in the country.
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In addition to creating her own innovative work, Sumi teaches pottery at Lakewood’s Washington Heights Art Center, and has led numerous workshops around Colorado.  She frequently contributes articles about pottery to the magazines Ceramics Monthly and Pottery Making Illustrated, and is a long-time columnist for the latter magazine. She edited the books Barrel, Pit and Saggar Firing in March, 2001, and Electric Kiln Pottery in February 2003, both published by the American Ceramic Society. Her book Low-firing and Burnishing was released in 2009, as well as a DVD entitled Pit Firing and Burnishing. Her book “In the Potter’s Kitchen” will be published later this year by the American Ceramic Society.

 


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For more information about Sumi, visit www.herwheel.com

 

 

 

 


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HOST & SPONSORS (back to top)

 

EDINA ART CENTERHost
4701 W. 64th Street

Edina, MN 55435
Phone: 952-903-5780

Email: ArtCenter@EdinaMN.gov
Website: edinamn.gov

 


 

 

AMACO/BRENTSponsor
6060 Guion Road
Indianapolis, IN 46254
800-374-1600
317-244-6871

 

www.amaco.com

 

CONTINENTAL CLAY- Sponsor

1101 Stinson Blvd NE

Minneapolis, MN  55413

(612) 331-9332

 www.continentalclay.com

 

    Mayco - Sponsor

    4077 Weaver Court South
    Hilliard, OH 43026
    614-675-2018

                                                 www.maycocolors.com

 

Pottery Texture QueenSponsor

 potterytexturequeen@yahoo.com

                                                  potterytexturequeen.com

                                                  “Like” me on Facebook! 

 

Segers Pottery ToolsSponsor
375 Sandleton Way
Evans, GA 30809
pamelasegers1204@yahoo.com
678-592-3833

                                                  segerspotterytools.com

 

 

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CONFERENCE VENUE (back to top)

EDINA ART CENTER
4701 W. 64th Street

Edina, MN 55435
Phone: 952-903-5780

Email: ArtCenter@EdinaMN.gov
Email: sshaughnessy@ci.edina.mn.us
Website: edinamn.gov

 

The Edina Art Center continues to be the home of creative, artistic education in Edina. We host classes for young and old alike. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to participate in programs in painting, pottery and ceramics, media arts, children’s classes and summer camps. Please visit the “Biggest Little Pottery Department in Minnesota” and other wonderful events at The Edina Art Center

 

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HOTEL INFORMATION (back to top)

 

Residence Inn Edina
3400 Ebinborough Way
Edina, MN 55435
(952) 893-9300

Website: Residence Inn Edina

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$119 per night
plus tax. Features free Wi-Fi, and complimentary hot breakfast. Spacious suites with full kitchen and separate areas for sleeping, working, eating and relaxing

 

Airport Shuttle Service: Airport shuttle service, on request, complimentary, call (952) 893-9300.

 

Ask for Potters Council (PCA Group Code) meeting block to get preferred rates. Room block will be held until Tuesday, September 23, 2013.

 


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Here are some additional links and information: Maps and Transportation | Fact Sheet | Restaurants and Lounges

 

 

 

 


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TRAVEL & DIRECTIONS (back to top)

 

Airport:

Minneapolis St. Paul Airport (MSP)
website: www.mspairport.com

 

Ground Transportation from Airport:

  • Car Rental - at Airport
    As a Potters Council member benefit we offer discount rental programs with ALAMO and AVIS. Read more…

 

 


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VISITOR INFORMATION (back to top)

Visiting Minneapolis for the first time? Bringing friends and family with you?  Start here researching what there is to do in the area.

 

Tours | Attractions
The history, art, culture and beauty of Minneapolis are marvels that must be experienced rather than witnessed. Nature meets skyscrapers, blending together to create unique sights and attractions that can only be experienced in Minneapolis. Tour the city with a knowledgeable guide, or venture into an adventure of your own; either way, the life of this city will unfold before your eyes.
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In Minneapolis, spectators become participants, so get ready to immerse yourself in our culture: Read more.

 

Arts | Entertainment
World-class museums. Breathtaking architecture. More theater seats per capita than any U.S. city outside New York. Minneapolis has become a premier destination for arts lovers.
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Take in a show at the Guthrie Theater, one of the city’s Tony Award-winning theaters. Discover new worlds at the The Science Museum of Minnesota. Take in the arias of Rossini at the Minnesota Opera. Or visit the Walker Art Center, hailed by Newsweek as “possibly the best contemporary art museum in the country.”
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Minneapolis is your ticket to groundbreaking art, architecture and performing arts. Read more.

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Sports | Parks | Trails
We love the outdoors. It should be no surprise that we are the American Fitness Index’s “Fittest City in America.” Lakes galore, the most bike-friendly city in the nation, a park every six blocks and four professional sports teams guarantee that your visit to Minneapolis will be active. Read more.

 

Shopping
We’re one of the best dressed cities in the nation. Our secret? We’re home to the country’s trendiest discount retailer and the largest shopping complex in the country. Shopping in Minneapolis is unlike anywhere else in the country. But Target and the Mall of America are just the beginning of the story. Here, you’ll find a combination of ambitious young designers, funky neighborhood boutiques, fabulous neighborhoods, major retailers and big malls. Downtown Minneapolis is home to Macy’s, Nicollet Mall, Saks Off Fifth, Target’s flagship store, Neiman Marcus, and dozens of other unique shop stops that offer everything. Eclectic, deal-oriented, chic, rustic, location-specific, flashy or reserved, our shops have everything for everyone.
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Oh, and did we mention no sales tax on apparel and shoes? Read more.
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Food | Wine
With four distinct seasons and dozens of international culinary traditions, Minneapolis restaurants offer farm-to-table experiences you won’t find anywhere else.
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Take the short drive to area orchards and farms, or one of our local Minneapolis Farmer’s Markets, for just-picked produce and local specialties. Sit down to a meal by an internationally-known chef at a Minneapolis restaurant. Farm fresh ingredients inspire many local chefs. Last year alone four local chefs were nominated for the James Beard Award – the Oscar of culinary – including Tim McKee of La Belle Vie and Solera, and Alex Roberts of Restaurant Alma and Brasa Rotisserie. Experience the flavors of Sweden, Germany and Poland — or Somalia, Vietnam and Mexico. From fine Minneapolis restaurants to local fairs, you’ll find a culture of locally-grown, globally-inspired foods that nourish body and soul. Read more.

 

 

 


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REGISTRATION (back to top)

 

You are invited to register online or by telephone.

  • Click here to register online.
  • To register by telephone, call toll free at 800-424-8698 or direct dial is 818-487-2054.
  • Student discounts (Valid Student ID) and Day Passes available, but they are limited. Call 800-424-8698 for more information and to register.

 

 

Mark Your Calendar and Register Today


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    After September 29
Potters Council Member   $365.00
Non Member   $417.00
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Registration fee includes the reception of Friday, and lunch on Saturday and Sunday. Make checks payable to Potters Council in U.S. dollars, drawn on a U.S. bank. Cancellation Policy: Full refund less $50 if canceled on or before September 10, 2013; 50% refund if canceled between September 11 2013 and October 10, 2013; no refunds after the start of the conference.

 

To cancel you must call toll free at 800-424-8698 or direct dial is 818-487-2054.