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If you want to convert cone 10 glaze recipes to cone 6, you’ll need to know something about glaze chemistry and the materials that work best at those different temperatures. If you just want to start with established cone 6 recipes, which is often a lot easier, there are now many people who have done the research and testing so you don’t have to. But don’t worry; there will still be plenty of glaze-testing fun for you to try in your own studio.

 

In Making the Switch from Cone 10 to Cone 6 Ceramic Glaze Recipes: A Little Knowledge of Ceramic Glaze Chemistry and Raw Materials Goes a Long Way, we present several successful examples of cone 10 glazes reformulated to work at mid range, and include explanations of the glaze chemistry behind these successes.

 

Here’s an excerpt:

 

Traditional Cone 10 Glazes Make the Leap to Cone 6

by Rick Malmgren

 

I have become a strong advocate of Cone 6 reduction firing in recent years. My reasons are as follows:

 

1. Lovely traditional glazes look as good as or better fired at Cone 6 than they do at Cone 10. Copper reds, Shinos, temmokus and dolomite matts are virtually indistinguishable from their Cone 10 brethren. Some Cone 10 glaze recipes don’t even need to be adjusted— a few look just great at Cone 6

 

2. Fuel savings amount to about 30% over a Cone 10 firing. Granted, that isn’t much per firing (only the cost of two coffee mugs per kiln load, as Pete Pinnell once said), but if you are burning $2000 worth of propane per year, as I was a few years ago, it amounts to a nice $600 bonus at the end of the year

 

3. The savings in fuel costs is nothing, compared with the savings of time and energy. Being able to fire off a full kiln load in 7½ hours instead of the 10½ that it used to take me is where the real savings comes in. At Cone 6, I can fire during the day and teach at night, on a more normal work schedule.

 

4. Though I’ve fired my kiln more than 700 times, each firing takes its toll. The hotter it is fired, the harder it is on the arch, the walls and the shelves. There is that much more expansion and that much more contraction, and that much more slumping. Cutting the temperature saves all the way around.

 

 

For more recipes, download your free copy of Making the Switch from Cone 10 to Cone 6 Ceramic Glaze Recipes: A Little Knowledge of Ceramic Glaze Chemistry and Raw Materials Goes a Long Way

 

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Making the Switch from Cone 10 to Cone 6 Ceramic Glaze Recipes: A Little Knowledge of Ceramic Glaze Chemistry and Raw Materials Goes a Long Way also includes the following informative articles:

 

 
Noodle bowl, 4 in. (10 cm) in height, stoneware with Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze, gas fired in reduction to cone 6, by Erik Haagensen.

Noodle bowl, 4 in. (10 cm) in height, stoneware with Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze, gas fired in reduction to cone 6, by Erik Haagensen.

Mid-Range Reduction: It’s Not Just Cooler, It’s Cool
by John Britt

There are a number of reasons why someone would want to fire at cone 6 rather than cone 10, but John Britt was not one of those people-until he was asked to present a workshop on the topic. His understanding of ceramic glaze materials and glaze chemistry helped him to quickly find a path from cone 10 firing to cone 6.

   
Crystalline glazed bottle, fired to cone 6.

Crystalline glazed bottle, fired to cone 6.

Cone 6 Crystalline Glazes: Developing Crystals at Mid Range
by William Schran

Historically, crystalline glazes have been the purview of the high-fire potter. But like everything else, if enough people experiment and test, good results can be obtained under all sorts of circumstances – in this case, crystals at cone 6.

   
 

 

About Ceramic Arts Daily:

 

Ceramic Arts Daily is a free online resource and newsletter written and produced for the benefit of potters and ceramic artists worldwide. The newsletter features both renowned and emerging artists, their work, techniques and artistic perspectives. Regular features include tips and techniques designed to help every artist expand their skill set and widen their artistic horizons. Ceramic Arts Daily also delivers video tips, in which potters and ceramic artists demonstrate various projects and processes. Think of them as e-workshops!

 

Ceramic Arts Daily is designed to be interactive, inviting your comments and fostering a community in which each person can contribute to the growth of their own and others’ skills. You may be surprised at what you learn!

 

Ceramic artists on Ceramic Arts Daily know what ceramic art is all about – from functional pottery to abstract ceramic sculpture. This is about community. You’ll be drawn in by artists’ stories, inspired by their work and find confidence to try some of their techniques. With Ceramic Arts Daily, you’ll learn a little bit of everything. Then you can choose the techniques you enjoy the most to create something new!

 

So start today by downloading our free Making the Switch from Cone 10 to Cone 6 Ceramic Glaze Recipes: A Little Knowledge of Ceramic Glaze Chemistry and Raw Materials Goes a Long Way. Then, get ready for Ceramic Arts Daily to introduce you to new artists and show you new techniques!

 



One Comment on "Making the Switch from Cone 10 to Cone 6 Ceramic Glaze Recipes: A Little Knowledge of Ceramic Glaze Chemistry and Raw Materials Goes a Long Way"

  1. Yvonne Pedd February 23, 2013 at 12:14 am -
    I’m a Newbie this is fantastic!

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