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Good news cone 10 potters! We’ve gathered some of our favorite traditional cone 10 glaze recipes in a convenient recipe-card format, perfect for printing and taking to the glaze lab or pottery studio. Whether you are interested in trying out some of the beautiful cone 10 pottery glazes that have been used for generations, or if you want to try something new, you’ve found the perfect resource. Here’s a couple of sample glaze recipes from 15 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes:

 

Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze Recipe

Click to enlarge!

Elaine Coleman's Celadon Glaze

Click to Enlarge!

 

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15 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes also includes the following gorgeous high fire pottery glazes:

 

reitzgreenglazeReitz Green Glaze
Cone 9-10

 

emilyspurpleEmily’s Purple
Cone 9-10

 

HAAA2OatmealHAA2
Cone 9-10

 

Oatmeal White
Cone 10

 

HanksShinoHank’s Shino Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 

crackleslipRhodes Crackle Slip
Cone 10, redduction

 

Mark Nafziger’s Gold Glaze  Recipe Cone 10, reductionMark Nafziger’s Gold Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 

Jim Brown's Blue Glaze Recipe Cone 10Jim Brown’s Blue Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 

Martell-1Peach Black Temmoku Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 

Celadon Liner Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 

Magnesia Matt Glaze
Cone 10, reduction

 
ColemanRedColeman Vegas Red Glaze
Cone 8–10, reduction
 
Ryan McKerley's Green to Black Glaze  Recipe Cone 10Green to Black
Cone 10
 

 

*Reminder: As with all things ceramic: results may vary! Use the beautiful images here as a guide to the surfaces you’ll get, but be sure to always start out with small batches and have fun testing and tweaking! Now get out there and mix up some new pottery glazes!

 

 

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Ceramic Arts Daily is a free online website and newsletter written and produced for the benefit of potters and ceramic artists worldwide. The newsletter features both renowned and emerging artists, their work, techniques and artistic perspectives. Regular features include tips and techniques designed to help every artist expand their skill set and widen their artistic horizons. Ceramic Arts Daily also delivers video tips, in which potters and ceramic artists demonstrate various projects and processes. Think of them as e-workshops!

 

Ceramic Arts Daily is designed to be interactive, inviting your comments and fostering a community in which each person can contribute to the growth of their own and others’ skills. You may be surprised at what you learn!

 

Ceramic artists on Ceramic Arts Daily know what ceramic art is all about – from functional pottery to abstract ceramic sculpture. This is about community. You’ll be drawn in by artists’ stories, inspired by their work and find confidence to try some of their techniques. With Ceramic Arts Daily, you’ll learn a little bit of everything. Then you can choose the techniques you enjoy the most to create something new!

 

So start today by downloading our free 15 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes. Then, get ready for Ceramic Arts Daily to introduce you to new artists and show you new techniques!

 


8 Comments on "15 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes"

  1. laura kadlec February 26, 2013 at 6:55 pm -
    im semi new to this stuff. i notice reduction, and oxidation on here. for oxidation, is it okay to still use those glazes in a reduction kiln? more or less me asking if the glaze will still turn out somewhat similar (obviously not completely the same) or would it just be best to forget it and find a new glaze?
  2. april March 13, 2012 at 8:32 am -
    does anyone have engobe recipes?
  3. Sharron February 9, 2012 at 6:44 am -
    Great recipes …do you have a similar offering for cone 5/6 glazes you can fire in an electric kiln? Thanks
  4. Tournadre January 19, 2012 at 7:50 am -
    Mon problème est que j’habite en France, je cherche désespérément dans le site pour me donner des explications sur les Frites qui sont utilisées pour fabriquer l’émail mais je ne trouve pas, même en allant sur les sites des revendeurs d’émail. Pouvez vous m’aider j’utilise le grès cuisson 1280° environ, frite Ferro F , les différentes frittes du livre. MERCI My problem is that I live in France, I desperately the site to give me an explanation of the French fries that are used to make the glaze, but I do not even up on the sites of resellers of enamel. Can you help me I use the stoneware cooking 1280 °, fried Ferro F, the different frits of the book. THANK YOU
  5. Sandra January 3, 2012 at 1:16 am -
    Cone 10 is around 1280 -1300C depending on your rate of firing. Always use pyrometric cones in your firings rather than just rely on your pyrometer or kiln programming. Place sets of cones on each shelf to get an idea of your hottest and cooler parts of your kiln. Document the results so as to get an idea of where best to place each different glaze you use. Sandra South Fremantle West Australia
  6. John December 10, 2011 at 7:53 am -
    These look interesting. As an inexperienced solo firer, I’m not sure of temperatures. Is Cone 10 1260ºc or what? John the Potter, B’ham, England
  7. Paul November 21, 2011 at 6:30 pm -
    Most of them noted REDUCTION which would mean gas.
  8. Mary October 31, 2011 at 8:43 pm -
    from a newby ,are these for Gas or electric kilns

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