selsorobvara_620The Obvara technique, which originated in Eastern Europe around the 12th Century, involves scalding the finish on the pottery to seal the porous surface. Similar to the raku process, a bisqued pot is heated, in this case to 1650°F (899°C) and removed from the heat. The difference is that the pot is then dipped into a specific Obvara yeast mixture before being dunked in water to rapidly cool the piece. The effects are quite stunning.

 

In today’s post, an excerpt from her new video Raku Firing: Expanding the Potential of the Raku Kiln, Marcia Selsor shows how to enhance the effects of an Obvara firing by texturing the surface and then shows the exciting process.- Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

 


 

 

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This clip was excerpted from
Raku Firing: Expanding the Potential of the Raku Kiln, which is available in the Ceramic Arts Daily Bookstore!

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To learn more about Marcia Selsor or to see more images of her work, please visit www.marciaselsor.com.

 

For more interesting raku techniques, download your free copy of Successful Tips and Techniques for Raku Firing.

 

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