Focus: Working Potters

Are you good at making tough decisions, setting priorities and sticking to them, working six to seven days a week, keeping your overhead low, living frugally, and sticking to deadlines? Then you should become a professional potter. Oh, by the way, you also must be really good at making really good pots—lots of them. You may be surprised to know that there are quite a few people who fit this description, and we’re featuring six of them in this issue.—Sherman Hall, Editor

On the cover: Daisy plates and trays, to 6 in. (15 cm) in length, press-molded earthenware with colored clay slips, 2009, by Victoria Christen, Portland, Oregon.
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Working Potters

Victoria Christen Portland, Oregon

Stanley Mace Andersen Bakersville, North Carolina

Charity Davis-Woodard Edwardsville, Illinois

Sequoia Miller Olympia, Washington

Joanna Howells Tythegston, Bridgend, Wales

Mark Skudlarek Cambridge, Wisconsin


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Text and Context: Stephanie DeArmond’s Letterforms
by Molly Hatch

Working with visual and written language, the artist pulls together various contemporary, historical, and pop-culture references that result in humorous and subversive constructions.

Yasuhisa Kohyama: Shigaraki Icon
by Kelvin Bradford

Wood-fired sculptures and vessels that deliberately avoid running ash in favor of simple, powerful forms.

Kristen Morgin
by Catherine Wagley

A sculptor walks the line between creation and disintegration using unfired clay.

Nancy Sweezy, 1921–2010
by Pam Owens

The arts advocate responsible for reviving Jugtown Pottery passes.

Studio Visit: Mike Jabbur, Santa Fe, New Mexico

When it gets to a point where stress is all I know, I remind myself that I’m trying to bring joy into people’s lives.


To purchase this back issue, call 1-800-342-3594.
Get great content like this every month:
Subscribe today!