Firing to mid-range, which includes cones 4-7, but most commonly cone 6, is increasingly popular these days. Some folks are reducing their firing temperature because they are thinking more about energy consumption from an environmental standpoint or a purely economical one. Others are just discovering the great potential of this firing range. So, we decided to put together a collection of cone 6 glaze recipes, packaged in a convenient recipe card format that can be printed, laminated (if you so choose) and taken into the studio. Today, I am presenting a couple of those tried and true cone 6 glazes from Diana Pancioli, but you can download (for FREE!!) the whole package on our free gifts page. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

 

 

Textured Blue Glaze Recipe Cone 6, reduction

Talc 17.0%
Whiting 10.0%
Frit 3134 (Ferro) 20.0%
Nepheline Syenite 30.0%
Edgar Plastic Kaolin (EPK) 13.0%
Silica (Flint) 10.0%
Total: 100.0%
Add:
Zircopax 10.0%
Cobalt Carbonate 0.5%
Copper Carbonate 1.0%
Rutile 3.0%
This is Marcia Selsor’s Waxy White base with a number of colorants added. This variation was derived from a 50/50 color blend with rutile incorporated in the base for texture. Goes glossy on interiors and breaks beautifully over textures.

These recipes are included in
Top Ten Cone 6 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for Our Favorite Mid-Range Pottery Glazes, which is free to Ceramic Arts Daily subscribers.


Fake Ash Glaze Recipe Cone 6, reduction

Bone Ash 5%
Dolomite 25%
Lithium Carbonate 2%
Strontium Carbonate 9%
Frit 3134 (Ferro) 10%
Kentucky Ball Clay (OM 4) 24%
Cedar Heights Redart 23%
Silica (Flint) 2%
Total 100%
This is a beautifully variegated fake ash cone 6 glaze. It is a brighter yellow on porcelain with hints of green where thicker, and terra cotta-colored where thin. It is not stable because it is low in silica, but to alter it would change the ash effect. While it does not meet strict requirements of stability, I use it anyway because I substituted strontium for barium.

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