High firing produces the most vitreous and durable ceramic work and many potters and ceramic artists choose to high fire for this reason. And most artists that fire to this range mix their own glazes. Fortunately, many of them readily share their high fire glaze recipes with other potters and ceramic artists.

Today we are launching another new free download in our ongoing freebie program – 10 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes – which is a compilation of ten great glazes shared by ten talented ceramic artists. As a sampling, in today’s post are two recipes from husband/wife team Tom and Elaine Coleman (who recently presented in a fabulous Potters Council workshop in San Diego, by the way). If you’re itching to turn up the heat, these two recipes are a great place to start. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.


Tom Coleman’s Vegas Red Glaze
Cone 8 – 10 reduction
Barium Carbonate 2.55%
Dolomite 5.61%
Gerstley Borate 9.18%
Whiting 8.68%
Custer Feldspar 53.57%
EPK Kaolin 2.55%
Silica 17.86%
Total: 100%
Add:
Copper Carbonate 0.41%
Tin Oxide 2.04%
Titanium  Dioxide 0.10%
Yellow Iron Oxide 0.10%


This post is excerpted from 10 Tried and True Cone 10 Glaze Recipes: Recipe Cards for our Favorite High-Fire Pottery Glazes, which is free to Ceramic Arts Daily subscribers.


Elaine’s Celadon Base Glaze
(Cone 8–11, reduction)

Whiting 21.2%
Zinc Oxide 2.7%
Custer Feldspar 24.9%
Ferro Frit 3110 8.8%
EPK Kaolin 17.5%
Silica (200-mesh) 24.9%
Total: 100%
For White Add:
Tin Oxide 0.7%
For Green Add:
Mason Stain 6201 0.9%
For Blue Add:
Mason Stain 6391 1.6%

 

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