Handbuilt porcelain bud vases by Jessica Knapp. Clockwise from the top: Orchard Purple, Base Glaze (no colorants), Tangerine Orange, French Chartreuse, Violet, Aegean Blue, Dark Red, Praseodymium Yellow.
Handbuilt porcelain bud vases by Jessica Knapp. Clockwise from the top: Orchard Purple, Base Glaze (no colorants), Tangerine Orange, French Chartreuse, Violet, Aegean Blue, Dark Red, Praseodymium Yellow.

If you like to pay attention to trends in color for wholesale orders or just to keep up on what buyers are looking at, today’s post is for you. In our latest free download, the 2012 Ceramic Arts Buyers Guide: A Ceramic Studio Supply Resource, we translate one of the most respected sources (Pantone’s Home + Interior color forecast) for such things into glaze combinations.

In today’s post, we excerpt from the Buyers Guide to share some of those color trends and give some suggestions for developing these colors in glazes. This can also serve as a guide to which prepared ceramic glazes may be the right choice for you to jazz up your work. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

Click to enlarge!

Click to enlarge!

Earlier this year, Pantone (known worldwide as the standard language for accurate color communication between designers, manufacturers, retailers, and customers, across a variety of industries) announced their biannual Home + Interior color forecast, which consists of nine color palettes and runs the gamut from muted tones to bright fluorescents — a broad enough range for everyone to find something to like. These palettes are a go-to tool for many artists and designers who pay attention to industry trends.


For a complete guide to developing color in ceramic glazes, turn to The Ceramic Spectrum by Robin Hopper, which is available int the Ceramic Arts Daily Bookstore.

Click to enlarge!

Click to enlarge!

Recipes!

Accompanying the Pantone palettes, we have pinpointed mineral choices for developing various colors in the glaze lab. Colors are listed with the various minerals needed to obtain them, approximate temperatures, atmospheres, saturation percentages needed, and comments on enhancing/inhibiting factors. A complete palette range can be found in Robin Hopper’s The Ceramic Spectrum.


Download your free copy of
2012 Ceramic Arts Buyers Guide: A Ceramic Studio Supply Resource to read this article in its entirety!

 

 

 

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