Nesting set, 15 in. (38 cm) in diameter, terra cotta with slips, terra sigillata, and glaze, fired to cone 03, 2010.

Nesting set, 15 in. (38 cm) in diameter, terra cotta with slips, terra sigillata, and glaze, fired to cone 03, 2010.

Two mugs, each 3½ in. (9 cm) in height, terra cotta with terra sigillata and majolica, electric fired to cone 01, 2011.

Two mugs, each 3½ in. (9 cm) in height, terra cotta with terra sigillata and majolica, electric fired to cone 01, 2011.

CM: Is the restraint and simplicity in both the form and surfaces of your work something that you have intentionally cultivated, or has it developed more intuitively?

CM: I’ve always been attracted to minimalism and simplicity. I was born with a sense of nostalgia for a time I never lived through. The textiles, artwork, and household items of the mid-20th century have always appealed to me. I am torn between a love for these industrially designed objects and an attraction to the handmade. I love the profile of forms from this time period, the graceful silhouette of an Eva Zeisel teapot or the beautifully irregular incised lines on a Lucie Rie bowl.

I appreciate a pretty wide variety of work, but am most drawn to forms that are well considered, graceful, and often quite simple, or quiet in some way. I am compelled by the details, the transition line where a spout meets the pot, the negative space inside of a handle, or a surprise drawing on the bottom of a plate. I like the sense of discovery that can happen as you become more familiar with a pot. It’s a lot like getting to know a person better, as you hear their stories and the details of their life.


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The 2011 Emerging Artists are featured in Ceramics Monthly magazine’s May 2011 issue.
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