Still Life Vessels with Birds, 33 in. (84 cm) in length, porcelain with underglazes, fired to cone 10 in oxidation, 2008.

Still Life Vessels with Birds, 33 in. (84 cm) in length, porcelain with underglazes, fired to cone 10 in oxidation, 2008.

 

Reflection Series 1, 20 in. (51 cm) in height, porcelain with underglaze, fired to cone 10 in oxidation, 2009.

Reflection Series 1, 20 in. (51 cm) in height, porcelain with underglaze, fired to cone 10 in oxidation, 2009.

CM: How do you develop forms, surface imagery, and narratives? What is your process and order for planning and constructing the close, complex relationships between them?

MK: In my very early work, I began to draw still-life scenery across groupings of several vessels to create many suggested perspectives and surreal space on top of the real space of the dimensional vessels. I would do this without models, drawings, or plans, just an idea that grew as I worked. I build raw porcelain forms and paint much of the work black with terra sigillata. With very fine tools, I begin to etch and draw and remove the dark to bring the various parts of the narrative to life.

 

My later work, while incorporating much of what I learned from making the earlier Still-Life Vessels uses birds and animals for the human stories that I want to tell. I like the power that art has when it tells stories, and my narratives are personal, from history, and from what I observe around me.

 

 


The 2011 Emerging Artists are featured in Ceramics Monthly magazine’s May 2011 issue.
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