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Wheel Throwing Techniques

For some people, throwing clay on the potter's wheel can be addictive. If you are one of those people, you have come to the right place. Here, professional studio potters provide instruction as well as inspiration for anyone wanting to learn, improve and master wheel throwing techniques. Browse these articles and videos for helpful information such topics as altering wheel thrown vessels or trimming large platters with complex rims. And, if you haven't already, be sure to download your free copy of Five Great Pottery Wheel Throwing Techniques: Tips on Throwing Complex Pottery Forms Using Basic Throwing Skills, which includes detailed well-illustrated, step-by-step pottery making projects by nationally known potters, teachers and workshop presenters.


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Bowl Making Turned Upside-Down

Posted On November 12, 2012 0 Comments

Throwing large bowls has been something that has dogged me for quite some time. There’s a certain size bowl that I just cannot seem to get past and while it’s ample, it is not necessarily what I would call large.

 

So I really like Martina Lantin’s bowl making process, which literally turns the typical bowl making technique on its head. In today’s post, Martina shares her upside-down bowl technique. Not only does this technique make larger bowls more achievable, but it opens the doors for adding gestural qualities as well. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

 

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A Beautifully Decorated Wheel Thrown Mug Both Inside and Out

Posted On November 2, 2012 5 Comments

Lorna Meaden considers all the details when designing a new form. That’s why when she came up with a new mug form recently, she decided to carry her mishima decoration around the corner of the rim to the inside of the pot. But this decoration didn’t start in the decorating phase. Paying attention to every detail, Lorna decided that it would make more of a visual impact to throw an interior ridge where the mishima decoration would stop and a different glaze would take over – a beautiful touch that makes for a successful form. In this video, an excerpt from her DVD Integrating Form & Surface with Porcelain, she shows us the cool trick she came up with to make the ridge. 

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Making a Large Sectional Vase with a Twist

Posted On October 8, 2012 1 Comment

Throwing in sections is a fantastic way to make large work. Rather than trying to muscle a lot of clay into center and pull a tall form, you can divide the clay into manageable quantities. In today’s post, an excerpt from his book Throwing, Richard Phethean takes this process a step further. He ovals the top section to make the pot more interesting. He also shows us an unconventional handle technique. 

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Video of the Week: Three Quick and Handy Wheel Throwing Tricks from Bill van Gilder

Posted On July 20, 2012 6 Comments

Bill van Gilder is one of those potters with a million cool tricks up his sleeve. If you’re not able to make it to a Bill Van Gilder workshop, videos are the next best thing. In today’s post, an excerpt from his DVD Pottery Techniques: Making Lidded Forms and Trimming, Bill shares three nifty tricks that he has developed to help streamline his processes. 

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Pottery Video of the Week: Throwing Large Pots with Ease

Posted On June 8, 2012 8 Comments

You may think bigger is better, but it bigger is not necessarily more difficult. As Tony Clennell demonstrates in his DVD Taking the Macho Out of Bigware, the size of a pot has more to do with technique than with muscle. A few basic throwing techniques — and a clever trick or two — will get you on your way to increasing the scale of what you can make and what you can imagine. In this clip, Tony demonstrates how to make a large vase in two parts.

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Video of the Week: How to Throw and Assemble a Yummy Candy Dish

Posted On June 1, 2012 4 Comments

You can never have enough receptacles for candy in my humble opinion. I really loved Jake Allee’s candy dish project from his new DVD Assembly Required: Building Complex Pottery Forms by Throwing, Altering, and Assembling because it reminded me that I could probably use some more candy dishes in my world. More importantly, because of Jake’s technique of throwing, altering, stretching, and assembling, I started to really think about new ways to make them. Hope it whets your creative appetite too!

 

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Pottery Video of the Week: Advice on Making Lidded Forms from Master Potter Tom Turner

Posted On February 10, 2012 6 Comments

A couple of years ago, master potter Tom Turner decided to record one of his two-day workshops and make it into a DVD. Today, we are presenting an excerpt from that, in which Tom explains the considerations he makes when making lidded forms. 

Robin Hopper smoothes the surface of a vase pottery form.

Wheel Throwing Video: Making a Multi-Part Altered Vase on the Pottery Wheel

Posted On December 23, 2011 0 Comments
Today, the Ceramic Arts Daily offices are closed and we are all scurrying about doing last minute holiday preparations. But we didn’t want to leave you hanging, so we are presenting a blast from the past Robin Hopper video.   In this clip from his full length DVD Advanced Throwing on the Potter’s Wheel: Extended… Read More »
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Pottery Video of the Week: How to Make a Wiggle Wire Mug

Posted On November 11, 2011 32 Comments

Today I am presenting a video from the recent Potters Council workshop in Indianapolis. Nan Rothwell shows us
how to make a super cool wiggle wire mug. As always, Nan’s demonstration
is clear and thorough. It’s almost like being at the workshop in
person!

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Stop, Drop, and Roll: A Dropped Pot Leads to an Interesting New Form

Posted On November 2, 2011 15 Comments

One day as Rick Berman was transporting a board full of soft leatherhard pots around his studio, a pot on the end of the board lost the fight with gravity and tumbled to the floor. Instead of just tossing it in the scrap bucket, Rick decided to drop it on the other side to see what would happen. When he blew air into the flattened pot, the result was a form he really liked and now deliberately creates. In today’s post, Rick explains how he refined this process and now creates his rolled pots.