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Ceramic Glazing Techniques

Get the details on a wide variety of ceramic glazing techniques. Experts share their tips and techniques as well as favorite ceramic glaze recipes, from low-fire to high-fire and everything in between. And don't forget to download your free copy of Three Great Ceramic Glazing Techniques: How to Formulate Successful Crystalline Glazes, Add Depth Through Carving and Layering, and Glaze in the Majolica (Maiolica) Style, a perfect resource for potters and ceramic artists who are ready to experiment with custom glazes, or for those who have grown tired of their own tried and true glazes.


Majolica glazing techniques allow Posey Bacopoulos to create both bold lines and areas of bright color, as in the oil and vinegar ewer set above, without the fear of having them run or blur during the firing.

The Magic of Majolica/Maiolica: How to Create Vibrant Painterly Decoration on Pottery

Posted On April 26, 2010 22 Comments

As Clay Cunningham explains in today’s post about Posey Bacopoulos, majolica is the perfect technique for potters with small studios because it requires only one glaze, a few overglazes, and an electric kiln. I am sure many of you can relate to the small studio factor, so I thought this would be a good technique to excerpt from our latest free download: Three Great Ceramic Glazing Techniques: How to Formulate Successful Crystalline Glazes, add Depth Through Carving and Layering, and Glaze in the Majolica (Maiolica) Style.

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Glazing Wheel: A Resourceful Potter Makes the Ideal Tool for Glazing Large Pots

Posted On September 2, 2009 21 Comments

Preferring the look of poured or dipped ceramic glazes to brushed or sprayed, potter Daniel Johnston had to come up with a system of pouring his glazes that minimized waste and gave him the look he wanted. So he came up with the perfect tool – a glazing wheel. Today, Daniel shares how he made his glazing wheel and discusses his glazing technique. Plus, he tells us a little about the large-jar construction techniques he learned in Thailand.

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Melty Goodness: Using Gravity and Layered Glazes to Add Depth to Pottery Surfaces

Posted On December 8, 2008 2 Comments

In today’s feature, Ceramic artist Kari Radasch explains how she piles glazes with various melting points onto her handbuilt terra cotta pottery and lets gravity do its magic in the kiln. The results are luscious surfaces with luminous depth…just the ticket (I still miss my boy though)!

Some glazes make interesting surfaces all by themselves, but no glaze is a silver bullet. Firing a piece multiple  times with different surface treatments can  bring individuality and complexity to your work.

Building Complex Glaze Surfaces with Multiple Firings

Posted On November 19, 2008 1 Comment

In today’s post, Nicole Copel describes how Yoshiro Ikeda has worked out a system of multiple firings that allows him to assess the application of glaze at each stage of experimentation. More important than his glaze recipes (at the end of this feature) are his techniques for using them.

In today's tip Jeannean Hibbitts tells us how to make this handy glaze storage system.

Ergonomic Glaze Storage: Save Your Back and Minimize Studio Clean-Up Time

Posted On June 4, 2008 3 Comments

Jeannean Hibbitts tells us how to make this handy glaze storage system. Not only does it make glazing easier on the back (less bending over the glaze bucket), but it can keep your glazing room or area neat and organized – a must for small studios.

Always wipe bisqueware before firing to ensure a clean surface for the glaze to cling to, otherwise glaze can slide off  an unwiped pot onto a kiln shlef during firing.

Glaze Recipes and Expert Tips for Great Pottery Glazing Results

Posted On February 6, 2008 10 Comments

In response to our recent features on using direct, stencil, and transfer approaches to achieve glazing patterns, many readers asked about the glazes that were used and where they could get the recipes. So, today, you’ll find recipes for three glazes used to illustrate the techniques detailed previously. You’ll also find some handy tips to keep in mind when you’re ready to get glazing!