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Pottery Making Illustrated




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Microwave Kilns: Great Tools for Testing Low-Fire Lusters, Enamels, and China Paints

Posted On November 22, 2010 19 Comments

Many people know that a microwave oven can be used to dry clay quickly when you’re in a pinch. Dielectric heating (the type used in a microwave oven) is also used in industry to fire ceramics for high-tech applications. This option is also available on a small scale to the studio potter, at least for firing tests and small objects using a microwave kiln. In today’s post, an excerpt from our latest free download the 2011 Buyers Guide to Ceramic Arts Supplies: A Studio Reference for Purchasing and Using Ceramic Supplies and Pottery Tools, Jessica Knapp tells you all about this alternate use for old microwaves!

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Pottery Making Illustrated November/December 2010

Posted On October 18, 2010 0 Comments

Theme: Functional Tableware

Remember the rule about form following function? Well, here’s an issue that really illustrates that your forms can be highly creative and still get the job done. Annie Chrietzberg writes about Paul Donnelly’s excellent cup and saucer combinations in our featured project for this issue, and she’s joined by other equally creative takes on the idea of functional creative forms. Martha Grover demonstrates how to make a stunning lidded form, and Joan Bruneau and Arthur Halvorsen provide two entirely different takes on ways on making exciting flower holders. You’ll enjoy all four projects and much more in this issue.

Buy this back issue – $3.99 (PDF only)

More than meets the eye—the lines on Jeff Campana’s pots go beyond just scratching the surface.

Decorating Through Disassembly: Jeff Campana’s Sliced and Spliced Porcelain Pottery

Posted On September 20, 2010 21 Comments

There are many, many ways to put lines onto posts – carving, fluting, painting, drawing – but, I have to say, I had never seen anyone doing it quite like Jeff Campana. Jeff takes his well-thrown porcelain pots, chops them up into pieces, and then reassembles them. Then to top it all off, he uses glazes that pool in the seams. Today, Jeff shares his technique and how he arrived at such a labor intensive process in the first place.

Pitcher, wheelthrown and hand-built porcelain, multiple glazes, fired to cone 10 in oxidation.

For the Birds: How Deborah Schwartzkopf Uses the Pottery Wheel Combined with Slabs and Molds to Create Her Avian Inspired Forms

Posted On August 24, 2010 11 Comments

Deborah Schwartzkopf’s work has gone to the birds – for inspiration that is. Using bisqued molds based on her observations of birds, Deborah makes work inspired by pelicans and loons and everything in between. Follow her through the process of creating molds and using them as forms for her assembled pots.

Pottery Making Illustrated September/October 2010

Posted On August 20, 2010 1 Comment

Theme: Surface Decoration

It’s hard to believe that it’s already approaching fall meaning
school and the Holidays are close behind. For the past several years,
we’ve celebrated the surface with our September/October issue and this
year we’re continuing that tradition with a stellar lineup of articles.
Take a look…

Buy this back issue – $3.99 (PDF only)

Grilling Season: How to Pit Fire Pottery Using a Good Old-Fashioned Charcoal Grill

Posted On July 7, 2010 45 Comments

It’s summer and time to throw some pots on the barbecue! Yes indeed, your trusty old Weber grill, the little round one on three legs that you might have left sitting in your garage when you upgraded your outdoor kitchen, can have a second life as a mini-kiln. If you don’t have a kiln but still want to fire some pots—or you have an electric kiln but you’d like to do some smoke-firing without digging a fire-pit in your yard or alarming the neighbors too much—the grill is a surprisingly versatile alternative.

Pottery Making Illustrated July/August 2010

Posted On June 17, 2010 Comments Off

Theme: Firing
If you think about it, Pottery Making Illustrated is like a
two-month ‘workshop’ delivered to your door. In the July/August issue
we’ve assembled a group of potters and experts exploring some
firing-related topics you’ll find exciting.

Buy this back issue – $3.99 (PDF only)

 

 

Liquor Service, 12 in. (30 cm) in length, porcelain and earthenware, porcelain bisque fired to cone 06 and glaze fired to cone 9/10 in reduction, earthenware single fired to cone 04.

Sip Service: How to Make Sets That Blur the Lines Between Functional Pottery and Ceramic Sculpture

Posted On May 31, 2010 70 Comments

Today, Mike Jabbur shares his process for one of his liquor service sets. Not only does Mike make lovely functional sets, but he also creates display units for them that elevate them to a more sculptural realm.

Throwing Ribs

Posted On April 28, 2010 0 Comments

Even though our fingers serve as our primary throwing tools,
there are times when a throwing rib does a better job. Ribs are a potter’s best
friend when it comes to defining profiles, wringing out water or adding decorative
touches. In the beginning, actual animal ribs were used for this purpose—and
hence the name—but now contemporary ribs are commonly made from wood, metal,
and plastic.

How to Make Custom Hardwood Throwing Ribs for Your Pottery

Posted On April 28, 2010 20 Comments

Making your own customized ribs is not only a way to help facilitate
your personal aesthetic touches, but, as Robert Balaban puts it, it
“permits creativity to extend from the clay to the tools.” In today’s
post, Robert shares his system for creating custom hardwood throwing
ribs.