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Glaze Chemistry

Remember, in high school chemistry class when you found yourself thinking, “when will I ever use this stuff in my life?” (unless, of course, you always dreamed of becoming a chemist). Well, once you have become hooked on pottery and ceramics, you will probably find yourself delving into glaze chemistry. Learning how different materials contribute to glazes and clay bodies is very important in expanding your abilities as a ceramic artist. So here we’ve gathered a bunch of articles and information on glaze chemistry to help you understand this incredibly complex and fascinating subject. 33 Tried and True Glaze Recipes, a perfect resource for potters and ceramic artists who are ready to experiment with custom glazes, or for those who have grown tired of their own tried and true glazes.


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A Super Simple Analogy to Help You Understand Glaze Structure

Posted On September 5, 2014 16 Comments

Ceramic glazes consist of three main components: glass formers, fluxes, and refractories. If you can remember those, and familiarize yourself with the characteristics of the common ceramic raw materials, you are in good shape to start developing your own successfulglazes. For today’s video, I thought I would share John Britt’s simple glaze component analogy. It is a great way to remember how the three glaze components function in a glaze. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Introducing the Newest Member of the CAD Family – Ceramic Recipes Website

Posted On September 4, 2014 2 Comments

We are super excited to share our new baby: CeramicRecipes.org, an online database for all of your recipes, whether you have your own or have yet to discover them. With smart phones and tablets as ubiquitous as they have become, we thought it was about time to create an online system for organizing, sharing, storing, and discovering glazes. So get ready to move your recipe collection from scraps of paper or three-ring binders to a gorgeous web platform, where you can access them ANYWHERE!!

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5 Tips for Making the Most of Ceramic Glaze Testing

Posted On August 6, 2014 2 Comments

The best way to learn about ceramic glazes and glaze materials is to test them. By studying what happens when varying amounts of various ingredients are combined in a glaze and then fired to various temperatures, you start to understand how materials affect each other, and therefore how to troubleshoot when your results are not what you wanted. But it can be intimidating to delve into glaze chemistry. It is extremely complex, and includes the word ‘chemistry’ in its name, which to some (me included) is an immediate red flag. So in today’s post, Greg Daly gives five excellent tips for getting the most out of glaze testing. Read on, and then get out there and test!

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Glaze Recipes From Two of Ceramics Monthly’s 2014 Emerging Artists

Posted On May 5, 2014 0 Comments

The May 2014 issue of Ceramics Monthly is out, and with it the ever popular Emerging Artists feature. 2014′s crop of artists includes 14 potters and sculptors. In today’s post, several of them share the glaze recipes they use to make their fresh and interesting work.-Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Time to Warm Up! 5 Red and Orange Glaze Recipes

Posted On April 23, 2014 0 Comments

After a long brutal winter, spring is hopefully here to stay. So to go with the warming temperatures, I thought I would share some recipes for warm colored glazes. Today, in an excerpt from her book Colour in Glazes, Linda Bloomfield shares some glaze recipes for lovely red and orange hues.- Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

 

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Video of the Week: John Britt Explains the Triaxial Blend

Posted On April 11, 2014 4 Comments

A triaxial blend is an excellent tool for learning about glazes and materials but if you’re new to glaze testing, just the words “triaxial blend” might give you pause.
Never fear! John Britt is here to demystify the triaxial blend in today’s video post. In this clip John clearly explains how a triaxial blend is set up and shows a fired example of a triaxial blend with stains, which nails the point home. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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How to Find Substitutes for Unavailable Raw Materials in Glazes

Posted On November 6, 2013 0 Comments

Glaze mixing can be daunting to the novice, especially when the recipe contains an ingredient that is unfamiliar or unavailable. But with a few simple melt tests, you can learn a lot about what materials do at your firing range and start making educated guesses as to what might make a good substitute for the unfamiliar ingredient. In today’s post, an excerpt from our new Ceramic Handbook Cone 5-6 Glazes: Materials and Recipes, Deanna Ranlett walks us through the testing she did to find substitutes for some frits. By following her lead, you can figure out substitutes for the materials you might be missing in a glaze! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Lichens and Lizards and Leopards, Oh My! Reticulated Glaze Recipes For Wild Ceramic Surfaces

Posted On September 30, 2013 8 Comments

Glazes are sometimes formulated to intentionally crawl and create reticulated surfaces resembling lichens, leopard coats, or lizard skin. Today, Robin Hopper presents a slip recipe and a base glaze recipes for such an effect, and gives examples of this slip and glaze combination with various ceramic colorants added.

Bottles, by Linda Burley.

Cool Colors: Ceramic Glaze Recipes for Greens, Blues and Turquoises

Posted On July 31, 2013 12 Comments

If you’ve seen anything I have made in the last several years, you know that I’m a little bit obsessed with pale-turquoise and pale-green glazes. I can’t get enough of them. So today, I thought I would share some samples of the glazes I obsess over. Linda Bloomfield explains the chemistry behind glazes ranging from the palest yellow-greens to some terrific teals. Plus she shares loads of recipes (for all firing ranges). There are many ways to get greens and blues in ceramics, but if you’re looking for a specific hue, this will help you find the right combination. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Simple Glaze Modifications That Can Reveal a Lot

Posted On July 19, 2013 5 Comments

Tom Turner has a new glaze video out and today I’m happy to announce that it’s available in the CAD bookstore! In this clip, Tom explains simple modifications you can make to a glaze recipe that can often lead to numerous new glaze discoveries! For example, by removing the iron from his example recipe, he comes up with a beautiful magnesium matt base glaze that could then be tested with other colorants. Have a look! – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.