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Functional Pottery

If you are a functional potter, you've come to the right place. Here, you'll find loads of articles on making functional pottery. Whether you enjoy coil building, slab work or throwing on the potter's wheel, you'll find a wealth of information on pottery techniques; from forming to finishing. And, if you haven't already, be sure to click on over to the Free Gifts section of the site to download your free copy of Contemporary Functional Pottery: A Discussion of Handmade Pottery by 11 Working Potters. It is a great learning tool for those interested in functional pottery. The projects are presented in an easy-to-understand, step-by-step format. The photos pretty much duplicate what you'd expect to see at a pottery workshop or a demonstration -- all the key steps are included. And if you're serious about functional pottery, don't miss Robin Hopper's seminal book Functional Pottery.


Maren Kloppmann: Working Potter

Posted On January 22, 2009 0 Comments
  Oval bowl, 23 in. (58 cm) in length, porcelain with glaze and terra sigillata, fired in oxidation, 2008. Wall plates, 24 in. (61 cm) in length, porcelain with glaze and terra sigillata, fired in oxidation, 2009. My last teaching job ended in 2002 and I consider myself to have been a full-time studio ceramic… Read More »

Work and Play: The Potter’s Life

Posted On June 1, 2008 0 Comments

Choosing Solitude Jeff Oestreich, Taylors Falls, Minnesota; Deeply Invested Silvie Granatelli, Floyd, Virginia; Small Rewards, But Who’s Counting?, Blair Meerfeld, Saguache, Colorado; Hard Work, Soft Clay, Mark Shapiro, Worthington, Massachusetts; Foundation Stones John Glick, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Pots in the Real World Ayumi Horie, Cottekill, New York

A Builder of Pots: Combining Handbuilding and Throwing to Make Altered Functional Ware

Posted On May 28, 2008 1 Comment

When throwing pots for long hours at a time became too much for ceramic artist Marlene Jack’s wrists, she altered the way she worked, putting more emphasis on handbuilding and looking at the wheel as just one of the many tools in her arsenal – not the primary one. As you can see in the image, the work didn’t suffer one bit. Today, Marlene tells us about her working methods and philosophies for altered functional work.

Stretching the Limits: Slab Building to Create Pots That Look Like Pillows

Posted On April 28, 2008 0 Comments

Today, we bring you the work of Margaret Bohls who stretches the limits of porcelain to explore the ideas of expansion and restraint. Margaret’s vessels have the appearance of soft, cushy upholstery. They seem like they are being inflated from within. She achieves this effect by painstakingly creating each bulge in her slab building process, which author Glen R. Brown elaborates on below.