One of the most remarkable things about clay is that you can make most anything from it, and in Ceramic Projects: Forming Techniques dozens of clay artists prove this over and over. You’ll discover some practical projects like Steve Davis-Rosenbaum’s unique Chip and Dip server and Dannon Rhudy’s Juicer to the more esoteric Pancaker of Keith Phillips and the exotic Condiment Server from Gwendolyn Yoppolo. Beyond simple cylinder and slab construction, these projects get into combinations of techniques-adding textures, cutting darts, extruding forms, faceting, assembling multiple parts, and more. Techniques that will make your work stand out. For the intermediate potter looking for the next challenge and the advanced clay artist seeking inspiration, these projects run the gamut of possibilities.

 

Softcover | 144 Pages

Order code CA89 | ISBN 978-1-57498-307-4

 

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A citrus juicer is not only practical to have but makes a great gift. Dannon Rhudy demonstrates how she makes her citrus juicers with a double-wall construction technique and finishes them off with a simple stable glaze. Perfect for any kitchen. DOWNLOAD Citrus Juicer

 

 
Annie Chrietzberg is not the only overly-involved-with-clay-person out there who brings more things home from a kitchen store for the studio than for the kitchen. While browsing among the bakeware, she came across some graduated tart tins with scalloped edges and removable bottoms. Voile! The perfect template for some nesting bowls.
 
Dick Lehman had an idea that took a long time to surface. After throwing a baking dish form, he used a footing technique he thought he had remembered from a workshop several decades earlier. As luck would have it, he reversed the technique but he could now make multi-sided dishes from his thrown forms.

 

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Keith Phillips is a one-time computer systems engineer who fell into the world of studio ceramics. He tends to look at the possibilities of rendering most any object in his newfound medium and when he saw a vintage Pancaker from the 1950s, he created his version in clay. Ingenious!

 

David Hendley loves the extruder but really doesn’t want his work to look like it came from one. His Twisted Lotion Dispensers begin as extrusions but then David manipulates them so much, you’re hard pressed to recognize their origins. He also demonstrates another twist on extruded decorations with his Rope-top Bucket.

 

The idea of fire and clay coexisting together appeals to Debi Nelson. It first struck her years ago when firing some pots in a salt kiln that she loved the way the light of the fire in the kiln played with the forms. Her Lanterns literally reflect years of work in perfecting a form that truly shines. Hal Silverman takes a different approach with his Lamps and Lights. He utilizes both the light source and the holder as graphic elements for viewing in either a dark or light setting each with different results.

 

While attending a workshop Andrea Perisho watched Mark Issenberg create his signature piece: a Three Piece Vase, embellished with decorative handles and ash fired. She describes his technique here and includes his glaze recipes.

 

Hanna Lore Hombordy was approached by a caregiver to design a special plate for a stroke victim. This got her to thinking about making Functional Ware for the Physically Disabled  and, as potters, it certainly makes us think about form following function in a whole new light.

 

Molded Plates is a really simple technique with lots of possibilities. Amanda Wilton-Green designed this project for her beginning students, but the technique can be used by the most advanced potter because of all the design possibilities.

 

Thrown forms that get altered into a shape other than circular have a wonderful look and feel – from the graceful throwing lines to the undulating altered form. Keith Phillips throws and alters two bottomless pots to create his Classic American Butter Dish.

 

Presentation is everything! Imagine yourself arriving at a party with a six pack of your favorite Mexican beer hanging from one hand and the belly of a Stilted Bucket loaded with limes in the palm of the other. Jake Allee shows you how to make the bucket, you’ll need to figure out the beer.

 

When it comes to food and pottery, Steve Davis-Rosenbaum is an expert on both. He designed his Chip and Dip as a way to transport a snack one handed, and his Covered Jar Set adds an element of elegance to the ritual of eating.

 

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Teapots are one of the greatest challenges for any studio potter. Many elements go into their production ad all the parts need to fit together. Ron Korczynski’s Spherical Teapots only require a basic pinch pot technique, but the creative possibilities are endless.

 

Cheri Glaser makes an Altered Teapot that’s thrown without a bottom which allows her to form the main body before she assembles the piece. Her step-by-step reveals the process including how to make a spout around a stick.

Every teapot needs a handle. As talented potters, we could make a beautiful ceramic handle, but sometimes a teapot needs a little natural element to it. Frank James Fisher makes Cane Teapot Handles by modifying cane handles with dyed reed. A touch of class!

 

A Brush Bottle seems an unlikely candidate for a project book but Frank James Fisher’s version is a good stepping off point for a variety of bottle forms. By throwing the bottle in two parts, he avoids the tricky part of trying to trim the bottoms. Hmmmm, not a bad idea!

 

Hanna Lore Hombordy was approached by a caregiver to design a special plate for a stroke victim. This got her to thinking about making Functional Ware for the Physically Disabled and, as potters, it certainly makes us think about form following function in a whole new light.

 

Molded Plates is a really simple technique with lots of possibilities. Amanda Wilton-Green designed this project for her beginning students, but the technique can be used by the most advanced potter because of all the design possibilities.

Thrown forms that get altered into a shape other than circular have a wonderful look and feel – from the graceful throwing lines to the undulating altered form. Keith Phillips throws and alters two bottomless pots to create his Classic American Butter Dish.

 

Presentation is everything! Imagine yourself arriving at a party with a six pack of your favorite Mexican beer hanging from one hand and the belly of a Stilted Bucket loaded with limes in the palm of the other. Jake Allee shows you how to make the bucket, you’ll need to figure out the beer.

 

When it comes to food and pottery, Steve Davis-Rosenbaum is an expert on both. He designed his Chip and Dip as a way to transport a snack one handed, and his Covered Jar Set adds an element of elegance to the ritual of eating.

 

Condiments and spices are some of the most concentrated, powerful flavors in the kitchen and Gwendolyn Yoppolo enjoys the challenge of presenting them in interesting ways. And her handbuilt Condiment Server and serving spoons are indeed interesting.

 

A thrown Handled Platter is ideal for fruit and salads, and for serving. South African potter Michael Guassardo provides step-by-step how-to information for making these pieces which will become the focal point of any table.

 

Lana Wilson is the maven of textures and reveals her signature technique for creating a Textured Platter. Annie Chrietzberg records her step-by-step procedure including her simple glazing technique along with her recipes.

 

Bowl forms are particularly interesting for decorating because they provide an expansive landscape to explore. A generous open object when functioning, a bowl acts as an offering yet also as an object of containment – a reservoir of reverie and Abstract Reflection. Lauren Sandler elaborates on her forming and finishing process that’s both instructional and inspirational.

 

The potters and ceramic artists presenting the projects here are experts in clay — many with decades of experience. These artists also spend time giving workshops or teaching courses so their information is thorough, up-to-date and amply documented. And you’ll delight in the stories and thoughts they have about the projects they demonstrate. With so many projects and scores of variations, you’ll find more than enough ideas to last a lifetime.

 

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If you’re an intermediate potter who is looking for ways to expand your repertoire or a pottery teacher who needs to satisfy more experienced students, the 26 projects in Ceramic Projects will keep you busy. Included are an extruded lotion dispenser, a citrus juicer, lanterns and lights, several innovative teapots, three-piece pots, and joined pots. The step-by-step instructions, accompanied by photos, are easy to follow and the forms are simple enough that it would be a natural next step to encourage oneself or one’s students to modify them and thus move toward a personal style. Many of the essays begin with a reflection on how the author/potter came to a technique or design-valuable information for potters who are ready to move past imitation and on to making their own unique work. The best of these is an essay by Annie Chrietzberg who describes how one of her students took Chrietzberg’s technique of slab-built mugs and, by adding thrown elements and linocut texture, came up with mugs that, while inspired by Chrietzberg’s, bear little resemblance to them. Whether you just need new ideas or if you’re ready to spread your wings and take off with your own designs, Ceramic Projects will be a big help. — Patty Osborne, Potters Guild of BC Newsletter – November 2010