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A Super Simple Analogy to Help You Understand Glaze Structure

Posted On September 5, 2014 16 Comments

Ceramic glazes consist of three main components: glass formers, fluxes, and refractories. If you can remember those, and familiarize yourself with the characteristics of the common ceramic raw materials, you are in good shape to start developing your own successfulglazes. For today’s video, I thought I would share John Britt’s simple glaze component analogy. It is a great way to remember how the three glaze components function in a glaze. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Video of the Week: John Britt Explains the Triaxial Blend

Posted On April 11, 2014 4 Comments

A triaxial blend is an excellent tool for learning about glazes and materials but if you’re new to glaze testing, just the words “triaxial blend” might give you pause.
Never fear! John Britt is here to demystify the triaxial blend in today’s video post. In this clip John clearly explains how a triaxial blend is set up and shows a fired example of a triaxial blend with stains, which nails the point home. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Understanding Glazes

Posted On December 9, 2013 Comments Off

How to Test, Tweak, & Perfect Your Glazes with John Britt

In this all-new Ceramic Arts Daily Presents video, John Britt lets you tap into his encyclopedic knowledge of ceramic glazes to build your own understanding of this complex topic. Starting with glaze testing—because testing is key to understanding raw materials and ceramic processes—John explains various testing methods that will help you get great results quickly. On disc two, John geeks out on materials, diving into the three basic components of a glaze—fluxes, glass formers, and refractories—and how various ceramic materials fit into those categories and work together to produce myriad outcomes. With this video, you’ll be able to deepen your understanding of glaze chemistry and improve your glazes at your own pace.

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Tips for Making the Right Test Tiles for Testing Your Glazes

Posted On October 4, 2013 0 Comments

Glaze testing is essential if you are interested in really personalizing and perfecting your work. And to improve your results, it helps to have test tiles that mimic the kind of work you make. In this video, an excerpt from his DVD Understanding Glazes: How to Test, Tweak, and Perfect Your Glazes, John Britt shows several different ways to make test tiles. Chances are, you’ll find one that makes sense with what you are making. – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Ceramic Stains: The Easy Way to Create All the Colors of the Rainbow on Your Pottery

Posted On February 4, 2013 3 Comments

Nowadays, ceramic artists are spoiled. It wasn’t that long ago that getting the colors and surfaces you wanted took a lifetime of experimentation. But because of developments in modern stain technology, we have practically every color of the rainbow at our fingertips. In today’s post, John Britt explains the ins and outs of ceramic stains and gives a recipe for you to experiment with.

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Oil Spot and Hare’s Fur Glazes: Demystifying Classic Ceramic Glazes

Posted On January 14, 2013 4 Comments

Oil spot and hare’s fur glazes are beautiful and fascinating. In a nutshell, they are high-iron glazes that are applied in thick layers, which bubble up through one another and generate patterns ranging from metallic crystals to running streaks. These effects resemble, you guessed it, oil spots or the striated patterns in the fur of a rabbit. Of course, the explanation for how and why this happens is far more complex than that, but I’ll leave that to the experts. In today’s post, glaze expert John Britt explains the science behind these lovely glaze effects and shares a number of oil spot and hare’s fur glaze recipes.


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Technofile: Demystifying Chrome Oxide for Fantastic Ceramic Glaze Color

Posted On October 10, 2012 9 Comments

Chrome oxide or Cr2O3 is a common studio material that can help produce beautiful colors in the kiln. But it can be quite challenging to perfect. So, in the November 2012 Technofile department in  Ceramics Monthly, John Britt, one of our expert glaze guys, gives the low down on how to get chrome right. As you’ll see, with a little know-how, chrome can produce great results. In today’s post, I am sharing an excerpt from that Technofile article and a few great cone 6 chrome glaze recipes.

 

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How to Build a Solid Arch Ceramic Kiln with Castable Refractory

Posted On May 7, 2012 2 Comments

Kilns can be built out of many things and castable refractory is one of the materials we rarely consider. Perhaps it should be considered more since it is reasonably priced, easy to mix, and easy to use. As John Britt explains in today’s post, if you are comfortable with casting plaster and making molds, you can handle building a solid arch kiln with castable refractory.

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Crazy Beautiful Crazing: Uncovering the Mysteries of Snowflake Crackle Glazes

Posted On September 21, 2011 35 Comments

I have been messing around with crazing as a deliberate decorative effect lately. But the crackle surfaces I have been creating pale in comparison to the Snowflake Crackle glazes John Britt writes about in the November 2011 issue of Ceramics Monthly. As you can see here, these crackled surfaces are pretty spectacular. Today, I am giving you all a sneak peek at that article, which includes lots of snowflake crackle glaze recipes!

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Celadons at Cone 6: A Traditional High Fire Pottery Glaze is Well Within the Reach of Cone 6 Potters

Posted On July 25, 2011 21 Comments

True celadons are high fire glazes, but there are lots of ways to get the celadon look at cone 6. In today’s post, an excerpt from the September 2011 Ceramics Monthly, John Britt explains one way: converting an existing cone 10 recipe to cone 6. To see some other ways, check out the full article in the September CM.