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flameware

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Wares made to stand stove-top heat. Explosions from trapped moisture, and resulting lawsuits have caused studio flameware to disappear from the domestic market. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flame-retention tip

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Gas burner tip that causes turbulence in moving stream of gas and air, intermixing them, speeding combustion, holding flame at burner tip, and preventing both flame-off and back-burning. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flame-rectification system

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
A burner system with automated reignition feature that immediate restores flame should it become extinguished. Usually incorporates a fire-eye ultraviolet sensor to monitor burner flame.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flame-off; blow-off

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
In burners, when speed of air/fuel mixture exiting tip of burner is greater than combustion rate—flame jumps off tip of burner and often blows out. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flame-flashing

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Surface effects caused by direct flame contact on wares. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

firing ramp

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
The profile or schedule for temperature change in a kiln-firing, often including both the heating and cooling ramps. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

firing down

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Maintaining some heat input after maturation, to slow down the cooling process, or to maintain reduction atmosphere during cooling. See reduction cooling.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

fire-eye

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Ultraviolet sensor used on industrial burner systems to monitor burner flame. See flame-rectification system.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

firebox

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
The part of a fuel-burning kiln where fuel gases combust before contacting wares. Gas kilns need little if any firebox, whereas wood and oil kilns produce long hot flames whereas require a large firebox unless flame-flashing and ash-slagging (with wood) effects are sought. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

fire clay

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Highly refractory secondary clays with minimal fluxes and usually fairly coarse particle size—low shrinkage, buff-color, often nonplastic. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook