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fluting

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Decorating technique involving carving or forming vertical flutes or grooves in surface of a piece. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

fluorspar

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  CaF2—limited use as flux. As with Cryolite, fluorine reacts w/silica at high temperatures, can cause pinholing, blisters. Useful in special-effect crater-glazes. Highly toxic in inhalation and ingestion.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flue

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Passages in kiln for flames or exhaust gases.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flocs

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Commercial flocculant used in glazes—1/4 tsp. per gallon of glaze. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flocculation; flocculate

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  The process of adding an acidic (usually) substance (flocculant) that gives particles in suspension opposite electrical charges, causing them to attract one another (to flock together)—a disadvantage in a casting slip but a great advantage in a claybody or a decorating slip. Usually only claybodies high in kaolin need to be flocculated by adding… Read More »

flint; quartz; silica; silicon dioxide

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  SiO2 —The primary glass-former in clay and glazes—vitrification, fluidity, transparency/opacity controlled by adding fluxes and/or refractories. Highly toxic in inhalation. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flashing slip

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Slip that is painted or dipped onto wares in order to promote flashing effects in the firing.  Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flashing

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Color change in fired clay or slip due to direct flame contact and residual ash deposition in wood firing, or due to variable currents of vapor deposition in salt and soda firing. Flashing can occur on almost any light-colored claybody, but is most dramatic on porcelain bodies and slips. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flameware

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
  Wares made to stand stove-top heat. Explosions from trapped moisture, and resulting lawsuits have caused studio flameware to disappear from the domestic market. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

flame-retention tip

Posted On December 11, 2008 0 Comments
Gas burner tip that causes turbulence in moving stream of gas and air, intermixing them, speeding combustion, holding flame at burner tip, and preventing both flame-off and back-burning. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook