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Ceramics Monthly June/July/August 2015

Posted On May 11, 2015 0 Comments

Working full time as a potter is a dream for a lot of people, and a reality for only some. It’s not an easy career path, even if it is a rewarding and creative one. Working artists in general were on my mind when I traveled to the Republic of Korea last week to attend the opening for the Gyeonggi International Ceramics Biennale (GICB). I was a member of the biennale’s International Committee, and in addition to the advisory work, and seeing the finalized exhibitions, I took part in a ceramics-focused tour. This gave me the opportunity to meet a few working potters in different parts of the country. We visited potters as they fired their wood kilns in Oegosan Onggi Village. We also had the chance to watch Heongyu Kim, who has made a living as a potter in Gyeongju for over 30 years, demonstrate how he uses traditional Onggi tools and techniques in his studio to make a variety of forms using earthenware clay. During our tour of Yido Ceramics in Yeoju, we met some of the many potters who worked in the small dinnerware factory and showroom. The six artists who are a part of this issue’s working potters focus write about how they have combined their studio know-how with business and marketing skills (learned from mentors or on the job) and personal strengths.  
–Jessica Knapp, editor.

 

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How to Map Out a Complex Wall Installation

Posted On April 29, 2015 8 Comments

Making a large wall piece out of hundreds of forms requires some serious planning, mapping, and methodical organization, along with a whole lot of patience and passion. But if done right, the results are stunning. In today’s post, an excerpt from the May 2015 issue of Ceramics Monthly, Monica Rudquist explains how she tackled such a feat (with the aforementioned stunning results!). – Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

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Geidai University: A Self-Directed Approach to Learning Ceramics

Posted On April 22, 2015 1 Comment

Imagine you are a student and you are required to make a large pot using 22 pounds of clay. Now imagine that your instructor demonstrates how to do this once, and then leaves. At Tokyo University of the Fine Arts, also referred to as Geidai, the professors trust that students of all levels will be self-directed, receptive, and willing to share their knowledge with other students. In today’s post, an excerpt from the May 2015 issue of Ceramics Monthly, Geidai graduate student Maggie Connolly presents a snapshot of the intensive, yet self-directed approach the school uses to prepare students for life as ceramic artists.-Jennifer Harnetty, editor.

Ceramics Monthly May 2015

Posted On April 14, 2015 0 Comments

In a way, each issue of Ceramics Monthly is about recognition, calling out artists for their achievements and ability, looking at the work and techniques, tools, and research that influence our field today. This issue focuses in on recognizing the achievements and skills of a narrower group within the field, that of our annual group of emerging artists. Choosing the artists is an immensely difficult but gratifying task. After all of the submissions are opened and processed, we bring them into a conference room in mail bins for the first round of selections. Each editor grabs a few bins, and sorts through the files, looking at images, and selecting submissions to consider further. We pass the bins around the table so that all submissions are seen and considered for the first round by everyone. As the pile of selected artists’ folders in the middle of the table grows, so does my curiosity and anticipation.  –Jessica Knapp, editor.

 

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Ceramics Monthly April 2015

Posted On March 9, 2015 0 Comments

We all have clay in common. We find it at different times, sometimes early on, sometimes as a second career, and sometimes as our retirement gig. I have found that artists whose work most intrigues me often have very focused interests outside of the clay world, and sometimes outside of the world of visual art all together, whether it’s birdwatching, botany, machines, gourmet cooking, physics, or the science of nostalgia. The artists in this issue all have different reasons for making a career switch at some point in their lives, and deciding to leave one field, follow their curiosity, and pick up a ball of clay to start their new career. We talk to them about their choices, and how their former careers have influenced their studio work. After all, while we all research personal interest areas and bring these influences to the studio when making work, when you’ve been immersed in a particular field or subject area through study, training, and work experience, it tends to not only form your knowledge base, but also to have a profound effect on who you are and the way you think.

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Ceramics Monthly March 2015

Posted On February 10, 2015 0 Comments

At one end of the spectrum, design is a process that is part of what we all do in the studio when planning to make new work. We think up ideas, define the concepts that are important, sketch pieces (in our heads, out of clay on paper, on a computer) that fit our chosen criteria, then refine the forms. During this process, in addition to considering form, we consider use, context, and audience, as well as the right tools (whether familiar or new) for the job.–Jessica Knapp, editor.

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Ceramics Monthly February 2015

Posted On January 13, 2015 0 Comments

Through my work at Ceramics Monthly, I also have the privilege of talking to and corresponding with a number of artists who have built significant legacies in the field of studio ceramics. We started covering some of these artists in a deliberate way in our March 2014 issue, and have included several articles on masters in the field in subsequent issues over the past year. In this issue we continue that focus as we talk to Robert Briscoe about life as a potter in our Spotlight department, and feature the work of Cary Esser, Cathi Jefferson, and Linda Sikora. Each of these artists have impressive careers as studio artists, teachers, and mentors, and share practical studio tips, recipes, and techniques with us.

–Jessica Knapp, editor.

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Ceramics Monthly January 2015

Posted On December 11, 2014 0 Comments

Installing ceramic vessels or sculptures in an exhibition space can be tricky. It’s something many of us deal with when showing work, so the editorial staff decided to focus this issue on a few different artists who create installations and larger compositions with functional vessels.

–Jessica Knapp, editor.

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Ceramics Monthly December 2014

Posted On November 11, 2014 0 Comments

The editorial staff asked five artists a series of questions that covered both the practicalities of designing and making sets meant for use, and the ideas that drive each artist to create these kinds of pieces. The artists also share details about their studio process along with slip and glaze recipes.

–Jessica Knapp, editor.

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Ceramics Monthly November 2014

Posted On October 13, 2014 0 Comments

We’re focusing on regeneration in this issue, with work by both Sam Chung and Margaret Bohls, who have explored different bodies of work throughout their careers. Their stories are well worth the read, and may even help you in your own creative path.–Jessica Knapp, editor.

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