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burnt umber

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Iron-manganese ore—good color source for basalt bodies. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

burnishing

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Method of achieving a shine by rubbing clay or slip with smooth hard object. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

breaking

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
In glazes, phenomenon where a glaze gives different colors in thick and thin areas—the color breaks from thick to thin. Effect accentuated in reduction firing when glazes reoxidize to different color in thinner areas, as in Temmoku breaking from black to brown, or copper red from red to clear. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

Bourry-box

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Type of wood-kiln firebox where primary air enters at top of firebox, passes down through wood, and combustion occurs at level of grates or hobs, and is supercharged by the heat of the coal bed. 

borax; sodium tetraborate

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Na2O×2B2O3×10H2O—a major LT alkaline flux, available in granular or powdered form. 

bonfire firing

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Earliest and most basic firing process, where wares are fired in an open bonfire. 

bone dry

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Completely dry (and very brittle) state clay must reach before firing. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

bone china

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Translucent porcelain containing bone ash. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

bone ash; calcium phosphate

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Ca3(PO4)2—HT flux—opacifier in LT glazes—translucence in HT glazes (from colloidal phosphorus globules) and especially in bone china (from supercharged glassy-phase). Toxic in inhalation. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

body reduction

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Period of reduction atmosphere induced between cone 012 and 08 to bring out iron color and speckles in claybody, especially in high-fired stoneware. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook