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car kiln; shuttle kiln

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Kiln where kiln floor and often the door are mounted on a car that may be rolled in and out of kiln on tracks. Sometimes has two cars, with doors in both ends of the kiln. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calipers

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Adjustable tool for measuring inside/outside diameters, as in making lids. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calcium silicate; wollastonite

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
CaSiO3—used in partial replacement of silica and whiting in HT bodies, improves thermal shock resistance. In some cases, it is used in place of whiting to eliminate L.O.I. Toxic in inhalation. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calcium phosphate; bone ash

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Ca3(PO4)2—HT flux—opacifier in LT glazes—translucence in HT glazes (from colloidal phosphorus globules) and especially in bone china (from supercharged glassy-phase). Toxic in inhalation. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calcium carbonate; whiting; limestone; marble; chalk

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
CaCO3—alkaline earth, contributing calcium oxide to glaze—powerful AT flux—major HT flux for glazes—gives strong durable glass. Sometimes used in low-fire claybodies to extend firing range and give greater fired strength. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calcium borate; colemanite; Gerstley borate

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
CaO×3B2O3—traditional important LT alkaline flux, but is no longer being mined. Replace with Ferro 3134 for LT glazes, commercial Gerstley borate substitutes for HT glazes. Test all substitutes. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

calcine

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
To heat a material to a temperature high enough to drive off all chemically combined water. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

burnt umber

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Iron-manganese ore—good color source for basalt bodies. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

burnishing

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
Method of achieving a shine by rubbing clay or slip with smooth hard object. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook

breaking

Posted On December 5, 2008 0 Comments
In glazes, phenomenon where a glaze gives different colors in thick and thin areas—the color breaks from thick to thin. Effect accentuated in reduction firing when glazes reoxidize to different color in thinner areas, as in Temmoku breaking from black to brown, or copper red from red to clear. Source: Clay: A Studio Handbook